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The Science Year Book for 1905

Nature volume 71, page 293 (26 January 1905) | Download Citation

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Abstract

A PLACE should be found for this Year-book on the writing table of every astronomer and meteorologist, and the volume should be available for ready reference in laboratories and schools where science is studied. The first section of the work contains an astronomical ephemeris throughout the year, short notes relating to the movements of the earth, particulars as to paths of the principal planets this year, details of eclipses, many useful tables, and maps of constellations. There are also meteorological tables and diagrams, physical and chemical constants, and tables of weights and measures of various kinds. Another section is devoted to particulars of scientific societies at home and in America, and notes on prizes and awards offered for scientific research. This list, which at present occupies only two pages, might be made a very valuable part of the book; for, so far as we are aware, the information does not exist in a convenient form anywhere. Particulars might be given, for instance, of the subjects and values of the prizes offered each year by, the Paris Academy of Sciences and many similar bodies. Short articles are contributed on the progress of different branches of pure and applied science last year, and there is a biographical directory which includes the names of fellows of the Royal Society and a few other men of science, but is not complete enough to be of much use as a directory.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/071293c0

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