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A Treatise on the Theory of Solution, including the Phenomena of Electrolysis

Nature volume 68, page 197 (02 July 1903) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THE present work is a rewritten and greatly expanded version of the author's book on “Solution and Electrolysis,” published in 1895. It embraces practically all the material on the subject of solutions which is dealt with in the ordinary text-books of physical chemistry, except that part concerned with velocity of reaction and purely chemical equilibrium. The treatment throughout is characterised by great clearness, especially in the physical and mathematical portions, so that the volume may be warmly recommended to students of chemistry who desire to increase their knowledge of this department of the subject. The first chapter is on the general principles of thermodynamics, so far as they are necessary for subsequent developments, and is followed by chapters on the phase-rule and on solubility. Then comes the discussion of the phenomena of osmotic pressure, and the related magnitudes of the lowering of vapour pressure and of the freezing point, to be succeeded by a judicious chapter on the theory of solutions in which the hypotheses of molecular bombardment and of chemical combination are weighed and compared. Thereafter come four chapters on electrolytic conductivity and electromotive force, leading to an exposition of the theory of electrolytic dissociation. Two useful chapters on diffusion in solution, and on solutions of colloids, conclude the work.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/068197a0

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