Books Received | Published:

Nights with an Old Gunner, and other Studies of wild Life

Nature volume 57, page 29 | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

MR. CORNISH'S books are widely known, and thoroughly deserve their popularity. He delights in the observation of live animals, especially birds; he describes with detail, yet with animation; and his sketches are rich in human interest. Few better books could be offered to a young fellow fond of nature, but not loving to take his pleasure too seriously. They inspire the love of close observation, and will help to make naturalists of a particularly good kind-men who will study their animals alive, and amidst natural surroundings. The illustrations are attractive, and some of the photographs from life included in this volume are acquisitions to natural history. Critics are bound to be critical, and we shall notice the trifling matters which we would see amended in another edition. A naturalist, bred in another part of England, may be puzzled by such local words as “marrum grass,” “crab grass,” and “king crab.” The present writer wants to know what they are, but cannot easily find out. The comparison of the shrimp and prawn (p. 87) is not exact, and we are startled to read of the hundred mouths o of the sea-anemone (p. 81). A little more information might have been given about the food, and especially about the winter-food, of the beaver. This would have led to an explanation of the purpose of the dam. But Mr. Cornish does not attempt to tell all; what he tells is told so pleasantly that we long for more.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/057029a0

Authors

  1. Search for L. C. M. in:

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing