Books Received | Published:

Archeological Studies among the Ancient Cities of Mexico

Nature volume 57, pages 67 | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

THE second part of Mr. Holmes' work on the ancient cities of Mexico has this year appeared, and completes the first part of a series of anthropological publications to be produced under the auspices of the Field Columbian Museum at Chicago. This work, extending as it does to over 300 pp. and containing numerous plans, sketch-maps, drawings and photographic reproductions, has been conceived on a somewhat more ambitious scale than previous publications of the Field Columbian Museum. It is evident at a glance that the greatest pains have been taken in the preparation of the plans and drawings, while the numerous papers Mr. Holmes has already contributed to various scientific journals are a sufficient guarantee of his competence to undertake a survey of one or more of the cities of ancient Mexico. In this field of archæological research there are already many patient workers who devote much time to the excavation and survey of the ruins, but there is no lack of material for study, and many sites still remain comparatively untouched. We must admit, however, that the two parts before us are a little disappointing. From the obvious care expended on them we were prepared to welcome them as a contribution of the first importance to Mexican archæology, but on perusal they do not quite justify our expectations. Let us hasten to add that this is due to no fault of the author, but is a necessary consequence of the plan and nature of the expedition of which the volumes are a record.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/057006a0

Authors

    Comments

    By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

    Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing