Letter | Published:

Romano-British Land Surface—Flint Flakes Replaced

Nature volume 52, pages 222223 | Download Citation

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Abstract

IN the early spring of the present year, whilst passing a newly-opened excavation near Caddington Church, three miles southeast of Dunstable, I noticed a very thin horizontal line of sharp flint flakes, embedded a foot deep from the surface-line of an old pasture. I could see at once that the line represented an old living surface, so I took a few of the flints away. In removing the stones from the soil, one or two little fragments of Romano-British pottery came away with them. The flakes were lustrous. chiefly black and brown-grey, and as sharp as when first struck. On looking over the flints in the evening, I was able to replace five on to each other. This fact, and the occurrence of the pottery fragments, proved the old surface to have remained intact from Romano-British times.

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  1. Dunstable.

    • WORTHINGTON G. SMITH

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/052222a0

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