On a Mite of the Genus Tetranychus found infesting Lime-trees in the Leicester Museum Grounds

Abstract

ABOUT the 13th of last September my attention was called to the strange appearance of a row of lime-trees standing in front of the School of Art buildings in Hastings Street. On examination I found that the whole row, with, I think, only one exception, were almost entirely devoid of leaves, the trunks and branches being covered with a fine web, very closely spun, giving them the appearance of being coated with a thin layer of ice, this glazed look being specially noticeable when standing in such a position as to catch the reflected rays of the sun. At first sight I imagined that I was examining the work of a spider, though I was unable to recollect any whose webs would accord with the character of those under observation. However, a close inspection revealed the webs to be tenanted by an innumerable number of yellowish or orange-coloured mites which were in some places associated together in dense masses or clusters, and more or less abundant over the whole of the trunks and branches.

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ROWLEY, F. On a Mite of the Genus Tetranychus found infesting Lime-trees in the Leicester Museum Grounds. Nature 41, 31 (1889). https://doi.org/10.1038/041031c0

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