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Sky Glows

Abstract

EVER since the sunsets of 1883 and last year there has been at times an abnormal glare both before and after sundown. But I have seen nothing in the way of twilight effect so strange as that of Monday evening, the 6th, when about 10 p.m. a sea of luminous silvery white cloud lay above a belt of ordinary clear twilight sky, which was rather low in tone and colour. These clouds were wave-like in form, and evidently at a great elevation, and though they must have received their light from the sun, it was not easy to think so, as upon the dark sky they looked brighter and paler than clouds under a full moon. A friend who was with me aptly compared the light on these clouds to that which shines from white phosphor paint. This effect lasted for some time after 10 p.m., and extended from west to north, the lower edge of the clouds, which was sharply defined, was about 12° above the horizon.

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LESLIE, R. Sky Glows. Nature 32, 245 (1885). https://doi.org/10.1038/032245a0

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/032245a0

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