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The Chemical Work of Wöhler1

Nature volume 29, pages 489494 | Download Citation

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Abstract

IT seems fitting that these walls, which have vibrated in sympathy with that brilliant eulogy of Liebig which Prof. Hofmann pronounced some nine years ago should hear something of him whose life-long association with Liebig has exercised an undying influence on the development of scientific thought. The names of Frederick Wöhler and Justus Liebig will be linked together throughout all time. The work which they did in common makes an epoch in the history of chemistry. No truer indication of the singular strength and beauty of their relations could be given than is contained in a letter from Liebig to Wöhler, written on the last day of the year 1871. “I cannot let the year pass away,” writes Liebig to Wöhler, “without giving thee one more sign of my existence, and again expressing my heartfelt wishes for thy welfare and the welfare of those that are dear to thee. We shall not for long be able to send each other New-Years' greetings, yet, when we are dead and mouldering, the ties which have united us in life will still hold us together in the memory of men as a not too frequent example of faithful workers who, without envy or jealousy, have zealously laboured in the same field, linked together in the closest friendship.”

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https://doi.org/10.1038/029489b0

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