The Encyclopædia Britannica; a Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General Literature

    Abstract

    IN reviewing the first volume of this new edition of the “Encyclopædia” (NATURE,vol. xi. p. 343), we were obliged, by want of space, to omit more than the briefest possible remarks upon the general plan of the work. The conspicuous and increasing success of the work is apparently a sufficient answer to those who would find fault with the form of arrangement peculiar to this “Encyclopædia.” Among the considerable number of Cyclopaedias which have been produced in Great Britain during the last hundred years, this one, almost alone, has been reproduced in a number of successive editions, growing in excellence and reputation, and many people might take this fact to be a sufficient proof that it is well designed to meet ageneralwant. But this success must surely be due in great degree to the eminence of the contributors, to the skill of the editors, or to any circumstance rather than the scheme of the work.

    The Encyclopædia Britannica; a Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General Literature.

    Ninth Edition. Vol. II., ANA to ATH. (Edinburgh: Adam and Charles Black, 1875.)

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    The Encyclopædia Britannica; a Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General Literature . Nature 12, 308–310 (1875). https://doi.org/10.1038/012308a0

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