Wakefulness

Definition

Wakefulness is a state of arousal in which there is a conscious monitoring of the environment and there is potential for efficient responsiveness to external stimuli or threats. It is in contrast to the state of sleep in which there is reduced responsiveness to environmental stimuli.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    • Anna S. Urrila
    • , Eric Artiges
    • , Jessica Massicotte
    • , Ruben Miranda
    • , Hélène Vulser
    • , Pauline Bézivin-Frere
    • , Winok Lapidaire
    • , Hervé Lemaître
    • , Jani Penttilä
    • , Patricia J. Conrod
    • , Hugh Garavan
    • , Marie-Laure Paillère Martinot
    • , Jean-Luc Martinot
    • , The IMAGEN consortium
    • , Tobias Banaschewski
    • , Herta Flor
    • , Mira Fauth-Bühler
    • , Louise Poutska
    • , Frauke Nees
    • , Yvonne Grimmer
    • , Maren Struve
    • , Andeas Heinz
    • , Andreas Ströhle
    • , Viola Kappel
    • , Betteke Maria van Noort
    • , Jean-Baptiste Poline
    • , Yanick Schwartz
    • , Benjamin Thyreau
    • , James Ireland
    • , John Rogers
    • , Nadège Bordas
    • , Zuleima Bricaud
    • , Irina Filippi
    • , André Galinowski
    • , Fanny Gollier-Briant
    • , Vincent Ménard
    • , Gunter Schumann
    • , Sylvane Desrivières
    • , Anna Cattrell
    • , Robert Goodman
    • , Argyris Stringaris
    • , Charlotte Nymberg
    • , Laurence Reed
    • , Gareth J Barker
    • , Berndt Ittermann
    • , Ruediger Brühl
    • , Michael Smolka
    • , Thomas Hübner
    • , Kathrin Müller
    • , Arun L. W. Bokde
    • , Christian Büchel
    • , Uli Bromberg
    • , Jurgen Gallinat
    • , Tahmine Fadai
    • , Pennylaire Gowland
    • , C Lawrence
    •  & Tomas Paus
  • Research |

    Motivated behaviors are critically dependent upon arousal but little is known about the neuronal mechanisms that coordinate motivational processes with sleep–wake regulation. The authors demonstrate that VTA dopaminergic neurons, which are central regulators of motivational processes, bidirectionally regulate sleep–wake states and sleep-related nesting behavior.

    • Ada Eban-Rothschild
    • , Gideon Rothschild
    • , William J Giardino
    • , Jeff R Jones
    •  & Luis de Lecea
    Nature Neuroscience 19, 1356–1366
  • Research | | open

    Sleep need is thought to accumulate gradually over waking periods and is associated with changes in neuronal activity. Here the authors show that in mice cortical firing rates increase between the beginning and end of wakefulness periods but this increase is not seen in waking periods with voluntary stereotypic wheel running.

    • Simon P. Fisher
    • , Nanyi Cui
    • , Laura E. McKillop
    • , Jessica Gemignani
    • , David M. Bannerman
    • , Peter L. Oliver
    • , Stuart N. Peirson
    •  & Vladyslav V. Vyazovskiy
  • Research |

    The authors identify a new arousal circuit in the mammalian brain. They provide correlative and optogenetic evidence indicating that a subset of hypothalamic cells drive awakening from non-rapid eye movement (slow-wave) sleep and emergence from anesthesia by exerting a strong inhibitory tone onto reticular thalamic neurons.

    • Carolina Gutierrez Herrera
    • , Marta Carus Cadavieco
    • , Sonia Jego
    • , Alexey Ponomarenko
    • , Tatiana Korotkova
    •  & Antoine Adamantidis
    Nature Neuroscience 19, 290–298
  • Research | | open

    The mammalian basal forebrain controls cortical rhythm and wake-sleep. Anaclet et al. use genetically-targeted chemogenetic systems to activate or inhibit cholinergic, glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons in this region, and reveal their contributions to behavioral and electrocortical arousal in behaving mice.

    • Christelle Anaclet
    • , Nigel P. Pedersen
    • , Loris L. Ferrari
    • , Anne Venner
    • , Caroline E. Bass
    • , Elda Arrigoni
    •  & Patrick M. Fuller

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