Tumour vaccines

A tumour vaccine is an agent used for cancer therapy or cancer prevention that elicits an immune response and induces protective immunity against specific molecules (antigens) expressed on tumour cells. There are currently no vaccines that can prevent cancer from developing, but some therapeutic tumour vaccines have shown promise in patients with selected cancers.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    Vaccination against neo-antigens has resulted in an effective antitumor response in several models. Here, the authors show that delivery of larger sets of neo-antigens using an adenovirus-based vaccination platform, results in much better tumor protection when combined with checkpoint blockade in a mouse model of advanced disease.

    • Anna Morena D’Alise
    • , Guido Leoni
    • , Gabriella Cotugno
    • , Fulvia Troise
    • , Francesca Langone
    • , Imma Fichera
    • , Maria De Lucia
    • , Lidia Avalle
    • , Rosa Vitale
    • , Adriano Leuzzi
    • , Veronica Bignone
    • , Elena Di Matteo
    • , Fabio Giovanni Tucci
    • , Valeria Poli
    • , Armin Lahm
    • , Maria Teresa Catanese
    • , Antonella Folgori
    • , Stefano Colloca
    • , Alfredo Nicosia
    •  & Elisa Scarselli
  • Protocols |

    The percentage of cancer neoantigens that are spontaneously recognized by T cells is generally very low. This protocol describes how CD8+ T cells from healthy donors can be used for enhanced targeting of these neoantigens.

    • Muhammad Ali
    • , Zsofia Foldvari
    • , Eirini Giannakopoulou
    • , Maxi-Lu Böschen
    • , Erlend Strønen
    • , Weiwen Yang
    • , Mireille Toebes
    • , Benjamin Schubert
    • , Oliver Kohlbacher
    • , Ton N. Schumacher
    •  & Johanna Olweus
    Nature Protocols 14, 1926-1943
  • Research | | open

    Tumours can escape CD8 T-cell immunity by down-regulating antigen presentation machinery components, such as TAP. Here the authors describe tumour antigenic peptides processed by TAP-independent and -dependent pathways and show in mouse models that these peptides can be exploited to induce antitumor T-cell activity when TAP expression is downregulated.

    • Aurélie Durgeau
    • , Yasemin Virk
    • , Gwendoline Gros
    • , Elodie Voilin
    • , Stéphanie Corgnac
    • , Fayçal Djenidi
    • , Jérôme Salmon
    • , Julien Adam
    • , Vincent de Montpréville
    • , Pierre Validire
    • , Soldano Ferrone
    • , Salem Chouaib
    • , Alexander Eggermont
    • , Jean-Charles Soria
    • , François Lemonnier
    • , Eric Tartour
    • , Nathalie Chaput
    • , Benjamin Besse
    •  & Fathia Mami-Chouaib
  • Research | | open

    Albumin conjugates can enhance drug delivery. Here, the authors repurpose albumin-binding Evans blue to develop nanovaccines that co-deliver adjuvants and tumor neoantigens to antigen-presenting cells in lymph nodes, resulting in potent and durable antitumour immunity in combination immunotherapy.

    • Guizhi Zhu
    • , Geoffrey M. Lynn
    • , Orit Jacobson
    • , Kai Chen
    • , Yi Liu
    • , Huimin Zhang
    • , Ying Ma
    • , Fuwu Zhang
    • , Rui Tian
    • , Qianqian Ni
    • , Siyuan Cheng
    • , Zhantong Wang
    • , Nan Lu
    • , Bryant C. Yung
    • , Zhe Wang
    • , Lixin Lang
    • , Xiao Fu
    • , Albert Jin
    • , Ido D. Weiss
    • , Harshad Vishwasrao
    • , Gang Niu
    • , Hari Shroff
    • , Dennis M. Klinman
    • , Robert A. Seder
    •  & Xiaoyuan Chen
  • Research | | open

    Viruses trigger potent cytotoxic T cell responses, whereas anti-tumour immunity has been difficult to establish. Here the authors engineer a replicating viral delivery system for tumour-associated antigens, which induces alarmin release, innate activation and protective anti-tumour immunity in mice.

    • Sandra M. Kallert
    • , Stephanie Darbre
    • , Weldy V. Bonilla
    • , Mario Kreutzfeldt
    • , Nicolas Page
    • , Philipp Müller
    • , Matthias Kreuzaler
    • , Min Lu
    • , Stéphanie Favre
    • , Florian Kreppel
    • , Max Löhning
    • , Sanjiv A. Luther
    • , Alfred Zippelius
    • , Doron Merkler
    •  & Daniel D. Pinschewer

News and Comment

  • Editorial |

    As the interaction of the immune system with the tumour microenvironment becomes increasingly understood, more evidence indicates how immunotherapy can be employed to better eliminate cancers.

  • News and Views |

    The development of therapeutic cancer vaccines has been pursued for many decades. Many vaccines can elicit immunity to tumour antigens, although their clinical efficacy remains modest. Recent results from two clinical trials highlight the potential of personalized vaccination strategies, made possible by high-throughput approaches to the identification of immunogenic tumour neoantigens. Thus, therapeutic cancer vaccines might soon move into the mainstream.

    • Jacques Banchereau
    •  & Karolina Palucka
  • Research Highlights |

    Two groups have shown that personalized, neoantigen-based tumour vaccines elicit effective T cell responses in patients with advanced melanoma, leading to favourable clinical outcomes. Combination with checkpoint blockade can be of additional benefit.

    • Ulrike Harjes
  • Research Highlights |

    Two groups have shown that personalized, neoantigen-based tumour vaccines elicit effective T cell responses in patients with advanced melanoma, leading to favourable clinical outcomes. Combination with checkpoint blockade can be of additional benefit.

    • Ulrike Harjes