Stars

Stars are large balls of plasma, predominantly hydrogen and helium. The birth, evolution and death of stars are of particular research interest. Other important topics include understanding the internal processes, such as fusion, that generate great quantities of radiation and the gravitational interactions between stars.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research |

    High-angular-resolution observations of 1.3 mm continuum and H30α recombination line emission identify a binary star system in formation, with protostars apparently separated by 180 au. The velocity difference between the two protostars constrains the orbital period and total mass of the system.

    • Yichen Zhang
    • , Jonathan C. Tan
    • , Kei E. I. Tanaka
    • , James M. De Buizer
    • , Mengyao Liu
    • , Maria T. Beltrán
    • , Kaitlin Kratter
    • , Diego Mardones
    •  & Guido Garay
  • Research |

    A new calibration of the surface brightness–colour relation of eclipsing binary stars gives a distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud that is precise to one per cent.

    • G. Pietrzyński
    • , D. Graczyk
    • , A. Gallenne
    • , W. Gieren
    • , I. B. Thompson
    • , B. Pilecki
    • , P. Karczmarek
    • , M. Górski
    • , K. Suchomska
    • , M. Taormina
    • , B. Zgirski
    • , P. Wielgórski
    • , Z. Kołaczkowski
    • , P. Konorski
    • , S. Villanova
    • , N. Nardetto
    • , P. Kervella
    • , F. Bresolin
    • , R. P. Kudritzki
    • , J. Storm
    • , R. Smolec
    •  & W. Narloch
    Nature 567, 200-203
  • Research |

    In this work, more than fifty late-time nebular spectra of stripped-envelope supernovae are studied in order to understand more about the massive-star progenitors of these objects. Type Ib and IIb progenitors are largely indistinguishable; type Ic progenitors likely have more massive carbon–oxygen cores.

    • Qiliang Fang
    • , Keiichi Maeda
    • , Hanindyo Kuncarayakti
    • , Fengwu Sun
    •  & Avishay Gal-Yam
  • Research |

    Kepler-107 b and c have the same radius but, contrary to expectations, the outermost Kepler-107 c is much denser. This difference cannot be explained by photoevaporation by stellar high-energy particle flux and it suggests that Kepler-107 c experienced a giant impact event.

    • Aldo S. Bonomo
    • , Li Zeng
    • , Mario Damasso
    • , Zoë M. Leinhardt
    • , Anders B. Justesen
    • , Eric Lopez
    • , Mikkel N. Lund
    • , Luca Malavolta
    • , Victor Silva Aguirre
    • , Lars A. Buchhave
    • , Enrico Corsaro
    • , Thomas Denman
    • , Mercedes Lopez-Morales
    • , Sean M. Mills
    • , Annelies Mortier
    • , Ken Rice
    • , Alessandro Sozzetti
    • , Andrew Vanderburg
    • , Laura Affer
    • , Torben Arentoft
    • , Mansour Benbakoura
    • , François Bouchy
    • , Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard
    • , Andrew Collier Cameron
    • , Rosario Cosentino
    • , Courtney D. Dressing
    • , Xavier Dumusque
    • , Pedro Figueira
    • , Aldo F. M. Fiorenzano
    • , Rafael A. García
    • , Rasmus Handberg
    • , Avet Harutyunyan
    • , John A. Johnson
    • , Hans Kjeldsen
    • , David W. Latham
    • , Christophe Lovis
    • , Mia S. Lundkvist
    • , Savita Mathur
    • , Michel Mayor
    • , Giusi Micela
    • , Emilio Molinari
    • , Fatemeh Motalebi
    • , Valerio Nascimbeni
    • , Chantanelle Nava
    • , Francesco Pepe
    • , David F. Phillips
    • , Giampaolo Piotto
    • , Ennio Poretti
    • , Dimitar Sasselov
    • , Damien Ségransan
    • , Stéphane Udry
    •  & Chris Watson
  • Research |

    Photometry and parallax data from the Gaia satellite provide direct observational evidence of a theoretically predicted pile-up in the cooling sequence of white dwarfs, which is associated with core crystallization.

    • Pier-Emmanuel Tremblay
    • , Gilles Fontaine
    • , Nicola Pietro Gentile Fusillo
    • , Bart H. Dunlap
    • , Boris T. Gänsicke
    • , Mark A. Hollands
    • , J. J. Hermes
    • , Thomas R. Marsh
    • , Elena Cukanovaite
    •  & Tim Cunningham
    Nature 565, 202-205

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