Stars

Stars are large balls of plasma, predominantly hydrogen and helium. The birth, evolution and death of stars are of particular research interest. Other important topics include understanding the internal processes, such as fusion, that generate great quantities of radiation and the gravitational interactions between stars.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research |

    Statistical analysis of velocity fluctuations in the interstellar medium (ISM) of the Milky Way and NGC 4321 show that the motion of molecular gas over scales ranging from 0.1 to 1,000 pc is similar, and consistent with that generated by a combination of gravity and turbulence. ISM structure at one scale is therefore linked to structure at other scales.

    • Jonathan D. Henshaw
    • , J. M. Diederik Kruijssen
    • , Steven N. Longmore
    • , Manuel Riener
    • , Adam K. Leroy
    • , Erik Rosolowsky
    • , Adam Ginsburg
    • , Cara Battersby
    • , Mélanie Chevance
    • , Sharon E. Meidt
    • , Simon C. O. Glover
    • , Annie Hughes
    • , Jouni Kainulainen
    • , Ralf S. Klessen
    • , Eva Schinnerer
    • , Andreas Schruba
    • , Henrik Beuther
    • , Frank Bigiel
    • , Guillermo A. Blanc
    • , Eric Emsellem
    • , Thomas Henning
    • , Cynthia N. Herrera
    • , Eric W. Koch
    • , Jérôme Pety
    • , Sarah E. Ragan
    •  & Jiayi Sun
  • Research |

    Analysis of a catalogue of accreted stars by their radial and prograde motions has identified a 200-plus-member coherent stellar stream (called Nyx) that is likely to be the remnant of a dwarf galaxy that merged with the Milky Way.

    • Lina Necib
    • , Bryan Ostdiek
    • , Mariangela Lisanti
    • , Timothy Cohen
    • , Marat Freytsis
    • , Shea Garrison-Kimmel
    • , Philip F. Hopkins
    • , Andrew Wetzel
    •  & Robyn Sanderson
  • Research |

    An analysis of the relation between a star’s initial mass and its final mass (as a white dwarf) reveals a kink in the initial mass range 1.65–2.10 M. This kink appears to correspond to the minimum mass required for carbon star formation in the Milky Way at solar metallicity.

    • Paola Marigo
    • , Jeffrey D. Cummings
    • , Jason Lee Curtis
    • , Jason Kalirai
    • , Yang Chen
    • , Pier-Emmanuel Tremblay
    • , Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz
    • , Pierre Bergeron
    • , Sara Bladh
    • , Alessandro Bressan
    • , Léo Girardi
    • , Giada Pastorelli
    • , Michele Trabucchi
    • , Sihao Cheng
    • , Bernhard Aringer
    •  & Piero Dal Tio
  • Research |

    Low-mass stars are expected to destroy their lithium content as they evolve, but this study of stars in the red clump evolutionary stage shows that their lithium abundance is on average forty times greater than at the end of the previous stage, something not predicted by theory.

    • Yerra Bharat Kumar
    • , Bacham E. Reddy
    • , Simon W. Campbell
    • , Sunayana Maben
    • , Gang Zhao
    •  & Yuan-Sen Ting
  • Research |

    A transiting planet with a period of about 8.5 days and a radius 0.4 times that of Jupiter is reported within the debris disk around the star AU Microscopii.

    • Peter Plavchan
    • , Thomas Barclay
    • , Jonathan Gagné
    • , Peter Gao
    • , Bryson Cale
    • , William Matzko
    • , Diana Dragomir
    • , Sam Quinn
    • , Dax Feliz
    • , Keivan Stassun
    • , Ian J. M. Crossfield
    • , David A. Berardo
    • , David W. Latham
    • , Ben Tieu
    • , Guillem Anglada-Escudé
    • , George Ricker
    • , Roland Vanderspek
    • , Sara Seager
    • , Joshua N. Winn
    • , Jon M. Jenkins
    • , Stephen Rinehart
    • , Akshata Krishnamurthy
    • , Scott Dynes
    • , John Doty
    • , Fred Adams
    • , Dennis A. Afanasev
    • , Chas Beichman
    • , Mike Bottom
    • , Brendan P. Bowler
    • , Carolyn Brinkworth
    • , Carolyn J. Brown
    • , Andrew Cancino
    • , David R. Ciardi
    • , Mark Clampin
    • , Jake T. Clark
    • , Karen Collins
    • , Cassy Davison
    • , Daniel Foreman-Mackey
    • , Elise Furlan
    • , Eric J. Gaidos
    • , Claire Geneser
    • , Frank Giddens
    • , Emily Gilbert
    • , Ryan Hall
    • , Coel Hellier
    • , Todd Henry
    • , Jonathan Horner
    • , Andrew W. Howard
    • , Chelsea Huang
    • , Joseph Huber
    • , Stephen R. Kane
    • , Matthew Kenworthy
    • , John Kielkopf
    • , David Kipping
    • , Chris Klenke
    • , Ethan Kruse
    • , Natasha Latouf
    • , Patrick Lowrance
    • , Bertrand Mennesson
    • , Matthew Mengel
    • , Sean M. Mills
    • , Tim Morton
    • , Norio Narita
    • , Elisabeth Newton
    • , America Nishimoto
    • , Jack Okumura
    • , Enric Palle
    • , Joshua Pepper
    • , Elisa V. Quintana
    • , Aki Roberge
    • , Veronica Roccatagliata
    • , Joshua E. Schlieder
    • , Angelle Tanner
    • , Johanna Teske
    • , C. G. Tinney
    • , Andrew Vanderburg
    • , Kaspar von Braun
    • , Bernie Walp
    • , Jason Wang
    • , Sharon Xuesong Wang
    • , Denise Weigand
    • , Russel White
    • , Robert A. Wittenmyer
    • , Duncan J. Wright
    • , Allison Youngblood
    • , Hui Zhang
    •  & Perri Zilberman
    Nature 582, 497-500
  • Research |

    Two sources of variability are reported in extreme horizontal branch (EHB) stars found in globular clusters, both related to the action of weak magnetic fields: large surface spots and very energetic flares. EHB stars in clusters can thus be linked to EHB field stars, and beyond, to other stars with radiative envelopes.

    • Y. Momany
    • , S. Zaggia
    • , M. Montalto
    • , D. Jones
    • , H. M. J. Boffin
    • , S. Cassisi
    • , C. Moni Bidin
    • , M. Gullieuszik
    • , I. Saviane
    • , L. Monaco
    • , E. Mason
    • , L. Girardi
    • , V. D’Orazi
    • , G. Piotto
    • , A. P. Milone
    • , H. Lala
    • , P. B. Stetson
    •  & Y. Beletsky

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