Renal replacement therapy

Renal replacement therapy describes the range of therapies designed to remove waste products, such as urea and creatinine, from the blood in cases of kidney failure.

Latest Research and Reviews

News and Comment

  • News and Views |

    Haemodialysis options for undocumented immigrants with end-stage renal disease range from standard of care thrice-weekly treatments to emergency-only haemodialysis. This latter approach is associated with poor patient outcomes and high costs. The time has come for the nephrology community to demand an end to the practice of emergency-only haemodialysis.

    • Rudolph A. Rodriguez
  • News and Views |

    The PIVOTAL trial shows that proactive intravenous (i.v.) iron administration reduces cardiovascular events and deaths, transfusions and erythropoiesis-stimulating agent doses and does not increase infections in patients on haemodialysis. These findings upend the warnings of guidelines and experts about the dangers of i.v. iron and prove that maintaining low iron stores is harmful.

    • Daniel W. Coyne
  • News and Views |

    Peritoneal dialysis has many advantages over haemodialysis in the treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI) in low-resource settings. One limitation, however, is the availability of commercial dialysis fluid. Following the International Society of Peritoneal Dialysis AKI guidelines, a frontline hospital in Cameroon now shows that locally prepared fluids are safe and effective.

    • Simon J. Davies
  • News and Views |

    The IDEAL-ICU study reports no mortality benefit of early versus delayed initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in patients with early septic shock and acute kidney injury. In the delayed initiation group, 17% of patients required emergency RRT but more than one-third spontaneously recovered renal function and did not require RRT.

    • Lui G. Forni
    •  & Michael Joannidis