Photochemistry

Photochemistry is the study of chemical processes that occur because of the absorption of light. The study of photochemical systems that use sunlight to drive important chemical reactions or to generate electricity is of great practical significance for the development of sustainable sources of energy.

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  • News and Views |

    The realization of perovskite nanostructures featuring high emission efficiency and a wide Stokes shift is proving difficult, limiting their impact on luminescent solar concentration technology. Now, engineered exciton routing within multilayered perovskite nanoplatelets may open a path towards high-performing, low-loss devices.

    • Sergio Brovelli
  • News and Views |

    Control of electron and hole concentrations in semiconductors is a longstanding challenge. Now, by managing defect populations, a p–n homojunction solar cell has been fabricated, opening a new avenue for metal halide perovskite devices.

    • Ji-Sang Park
    •  & Aron Walsh
    Nature Energy 4, 95-96
  • Editorial |

    This year marks ten years of organic–inorganic perovskite solar cell research. Now, after achieving remarkable gains in performance, applications are starting to make their way out of research laboratories into the real world.

  • Comments and Opinion | | open

    When translating photovoltaic technology from laboratory to commercial products, low cost, high power conversion efficiency, and high stability (long lifetime) are the three key metrics to consider in addition to other factors, such as low toxicity, low energy payback time, etc. As one of the most promising photovoltaic materials with high efficiency, today organic–inorganic metal halide perovskites draw tremendous attention from fundamental research, but their practical relevance still remains unclear owing to the notorious short device operation time. In this comment, we discuss the stability issue of perovskite photovoltaics and call for standardized protocols for device characterizations that could possibly match the silicon industrial standards.

    • Lei Meng
    • , Jingbi You
    •  & Yang Yang