Particle astrophysics

Definition

Particle astrophysics is the study of fundamental particles travelling through space, particularly those that reach the Earth. These cosmic rays include photons, protons, alpha particles and neutrinos. Some of these decay to other particles in the atmosphere, while neutrinos can pass through the entire Earth without being absorbed.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research |

    Ultrarelativistic photons and neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts offer a testbed for quantum gravity effects that would lead to an energy dependence of the travel times. A statistical analysis of astrophysical data shows that this behaviour may have been observed.

    • Giovanni Amelino-Camelia
    • , Giacomo D’Amico
    • , Giacomo Rosati
    •  & Niccoló Loret
  • Research |

    The origin of Galactic positrons that produce gamma ray emission when annihilated is still debated. Mergers of two white dwarfs are likely to be the main source of these positrons. Such mergers produce sub-luminous, thermonuclear supernovae.

    • Roland M. Crocker
    • , Ashley J. Ruiter
    • , Ivo R. Seitenzahl
    • , Fiona H. Panther
    • , Stuart Sim
    • , Holger Baumgardt
    • , Anais Möller
    • , David M. Nataf
    • , Lilia Ferrario
    • , J. J. Eldridge
    • , Martin White
    • , Brad E. Tucker
    •  & Felix Aharonian
  • Research | | open

    Axions are hypothetical light particles that could explain the dark matter. They could be produced in the interior of the Sun and the CERN Axion Solar Telescope sets the best limit on how strongly axions can interact with light.

    • CAST Collaboration
    • , V. Anastassopoulos
    • , S. Aune
    • , K. Barth
    • , A. Belov
    • , H. Bräuninger
    • , G. Cantatore
    • , J. M. Carmona
    • , J. F. Castel
    • , S. A. Cetin
    • , F. Christensen
    • , J. I. Collar
    • , T. Dafni
    • , M. Davenport
    • , T. A. Decker
    • , A. Dermenev
    • , K. Desch
    • , C. Eleftheriadis
    • , G. Fanourakis
    • , E. Ferrer-Ribas
    • , H. Fischer
    • , J. A. García
    • , A. Gardikiotis
    • , J. G. Garza
    • , E. N. Gazis
    • , T. Geralis
    • , I. Giomataris
    • , S. Gninenko
    • , C. J. Hailey
    • , M. D. Hasinoff
    • , D. H. H. Hoffmann
    • , F. J. Iguaz
    • , I. G. Irastorza
    • , A. Jakobsen
    • , J. Jacoby
    • , K. Jakovčić
    • , J. Kaminski
    • , M. Karuza
    • , N. Kralj
    • , M. Krčmar
    • , S. Kostoglou
    • , Ch. Krieger
    • , B. Lakić
    • , J. M. Laurent
    • , A. Liolios
    • , A. Ljubičić
    • , G. Luzón
    • , M. Maroudas
    • , L. Miceli
    • , S. Neff
    • , I. Ortega
    • , T. Papaevangelou
    • , K. Paraschou
    • , M. J. Pivovaroff
    • , G. Raffelt
    • , M. Rosu
    • , J. Ruz
    • , E. Ruiz Chóliz
    • , I. Savvidis
    • , S. Schmidt
    • , Y. K. Semertzidis
    • , S. K. Solanki
    • , L. Stewart
    • , T. Vafeiadis
    • , J. K. Vogel
    • , S. C. Yildiz
    •  & K. Zioutas
    Nature Physics 13, 584–590
  • Reviews |

    From the first hints of unseen matter in the Universe to the present body of evidence for dark matter, James Peebles outlines the significant developments in observation and theory in the 1970s in this Insight Perspective.

    • P. J. E. Peebles

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