Oogenesis

Oogenesis is the development of the mature female germ cells called egg cells or ova. Primordial germ cells, the founder cells of the germ line, develop through several immature stages by undergoing mitosis, meiosis and differentiation into the haploid egg cells, which carry only one set of chromosomes.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research |

    Stella, a factor essential for female fertility, protects the oocyte methylome in mice by suppressing de novo DNA methylation mediated by the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1.

    • Yingfeng Li
    • , Zhuqiang Zhang
    • , Jiayu Chen
    • , Wenqiang Liu
    • , Weiyi Lai
    • , Baodong Liu
    • , Xiang Li
    • , Liping Liu
    • , Shaohua Xu
    • , Qiang Dong
    • , Mingzhu Wang
    • , Xiaoya Duan
    • , Jiajun Tan
    • , Yong Zheng
    • , Pumin Zhang
    • , Guoping Fan
    • , Jiemin Wong
    • , Guo-Liang Xu
    • , Zhigao Wang
    • , Hailin Wang
    • , Shaorong Gao
    •  & Bing Zhu
    Nature 564, 136-140
  • Research | | open

    Germline cells in many species are fused to form a syncytium but the mechanics behind the maintenance of these structures are poorly defined. Here, the authors propose an inner contractile actomyosin corset provides a supportive framework to maintain germline architecture in C. elegans.

    • Agarwal Priti
    • , Hui Ting Ong
    • , Yusuke Toyama
    • , Anup Padmanabhan
    • , Sabyasachi Dasgupta
    • , Matej Krajnc
    •  & Ronen Zaidel-Bar
  • Research |

    Analysis of 1,007 sibling pairs from 251 families identifies 878 de novo mutations shared by siblings at 448 sites. Recurrence probability based on parental somatic mosaicism, sibling sharing, parent of origin, mutation type and genomic position can range from 0.011% to 28.5%.

    • Hákon Jónsson
    • , Patrick Sulem
    • , Gudny A. Arnadottir
    • , Gunnar Pálsson
    • , Hannes P. Eggertsson
    • , Snaedis Kristmundsdottir
    • , Florian Zink
    • , Birte Kehr
    • , Kristjan E. Hjorleifsson
    • , Brynjar Ö. Jensson
    • , Ingileif Jonsdottir
    • , Sigurdur Einar Marelsson
    • , Sigurjon Axel Gudjonsson
    • , Arnaldur Gylfason
    • , Adalbjorg Jonasdottir
    • , Aslaug Jonasdottir
    • , Simon N. Stacey
    • , Olafur Th. Magnusson
    • , Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
    • , Gisli Masson
    • , Augustine Kong
    • , Bjarni V. Halldorsson
    • , Agnar Helgason
    • , Daniel F. Gudbjartsson
    •  & Kari Stefansson
    Nature Genetics 50, 1674-1680
  • Research | | open

    Paternal contributions to epigenetic inheritance via nucleosomes are poorly understood, as sperm in many organisms replace the majority of nucleosomes with protamines. Here the authors provide evidence that Caenorhabditis elegans sperm retain histone packaging of the genome and provide a histone-based epigenetic memory that is important for germ cell development in offspring.

    • Tomoko M. Tabuchi
    • , Andreas Rechtsteiner
    • , Tess E. Jeffers
    • , Thea A. Egelhofer
    • , Coleen T. Murphy
    •  & Susan Strome

News and Comment

  • News and Views |

    Maternal high-fat diet has a negative impact on fertility—including an apparent direct effect on early development. In this issue, a new study connects this phenotype to depletion of Stella protein in oocytes, demonstrating environmental regulation of a maternal-effect gene.

    • Harry G. Leitch
    •  & Petra Hajkova
    Nature Genetics 50, 318-319
  • News and Views |

    How maternal diet influences offspring metabolism is unclear, as it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of the in utero environment and epigenetic factors contributed by the oocyte. In a mouse model of high-fat diet, a new study teases apart these mechanisms by using in vitro fertilization and shows that susceptibility of offspring to metabolic disorder can likely be attributed to epigenetic inheritance via the oocyte.

    • Erica D Watson
    •  & Joanna Rakoczy
    Nature Genetics 48, 478-479
  • News and Views |

    Crossing over, or reciprocal recombination, is essential for accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes at the first meiotic division, resulting in gametes containing the correct chromosome number. A new study in human oocytes analyzes the genome-wide recombination and segregation patterns in all the products of female meiosis, providing experimental support for existing theories about the origin of human aneuploidies and highlighting a novel reverse segregation mechanism of chromosome segregation during meiosis.

    • Miguel A Brieño-Enríquez
    •  & Paula E Cohen
    Nature Genetics 47, 696-698
  • News and Views |

    Meiotic tetrad analysis is a powerful tool for analyzing all four products of a single meiosis. A new method for tetrad analysis in mammals provides valuable insights into the mechanisms that mediate the exchange of DNA sequences between homologs during meiosis and their influence on the evolution of recombination hotspots.

    • Danny E Miller
    •  & R Scott Hawley
    Nature Genetics 46, 1045-1046