Nanoscience and technology

Definition

Nanoscience and technology is the branch of science that studies systems and manipulates matter on atomic, molecular and supramolecular scales (the nanometre scale). On such a length scale, quantum mechanical and surface boundary effects become relevant, conferring properties on materials that are not observable on larger, macroscopic length scales.

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Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research |

    Disordered nanoscale striations on petals, tepals and bracts have evolved multiple times among flowering plants and provide a salient visual signal to foraging bumblebees (Bombus terrestris).

    • Edwige Moyroud
    • , Tobias Wenzel
    • , Rox Middleton
    • , Paula J. Rudall
    • , Hannah Banks
    • , Alison Reed
    • , Greg Mellers
    • , Patrick Killoran
    • , M. Murphy Westwood
    • , Ullrich Steiner
    • , Silvia Vignolini
    •  & Beverley J. Glover
  • Research |

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy is used to resolve the structure of the phycobilisome, a 16.8-megadalton light-harvesting megacomplex, from the red alga Griffithsia pacifica at a resolution of 3.5 Å.

    • Jun Zhang
    • , Jianfei Ma
    • , Desheng Liu
    • , Song Qin
    • , Shan Sun
    • , Jindong Zhao
    •  & Sen-Fang Sui
  • Research | | open

    State-of-the-art methods for sensing weak AC fields are only efficient in the low frequency domain. Here, Stark et al. demonstrate a sensing scheme that is capable of probing high frequencies through continuous dynamical coupling by applying it to a nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond.

    • Alexander Stark
    • , Nati Aharon
    • , Thomas Unden
    • , Daniel Louzon
    • , Alexander Huck
    • , Alex Retzker
    • , Ulrik L. Andersen
    •  & Fedor Jelezko
  • Research | | open

    U1 snRNP is critical for 5′ splicing site recognition in pre-mRNA splicing. Here the authors describe the cryo-EM structure of the yeast U1 snRNP and suggest that PrpF39 is an alternative splicing factor essential for the successful recruitment of U1 snRNP by other alternative splicing factors.

    • Xueni Li
    • , Shiheng Liu
    • , Jiansen Jiang
    • , Lingdi Zhang
    • , Sara Espinosa
    • , Ryan C. Hill
    • , Kirk C. Hansen
    • , Z. Hong Zhou
    •  & Rui Zhao
  • Research | | open

    DNA nanostructures can cage enzymes but currently fall short of controlling their reactions with substrates. Here, the authors enclose an enzyme inside a dynamic DNA vault, which regulates its access to substrate molecules—and thus its enzymatic activity—through a multi-lock mechanism.

    • Guido Grossi
    • , Mette Dalgaard Ebbesen Jepsen
    • , Jørgen Kjems
    •  & Ebbe Sloth Andersen

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