Mass spectrometry

Definition

Mass spectrometry is an analytical technique that uses an instrument called a mass spectrometer to measure the mass-to-charge ratios of molecular ions. Molecules fragment within the mass spectrometer to produce a mass spectrum, which can be interpreted to determine the identity of the molecules in the sample.

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Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    Chitosanases are classified according to their specificity in cleaving bonds at GlcNAc residues but the current system may be too simplistic. Here, the authors use quantitative mass spectrometry to revisit chitosanase specificity and propose additional determinants for their classification.

    • Tobias Weikert
    • , Anna Niehues
    • , Stefan Cord-Landwehr
    • , Margareta J. Hellmann
    •  & Bruno M. Moerschbacher
  • Research |

    The high spatial resolution of secondary ion mass spectrometry and the high resolving power of the Orbitrap mass spectrometer are combined in a single imaging platform, the 3D OrbiSIMS. The instrument's capabilities for resolving lipids and neurotransmitters in the brain with subcellular spatial resolution, and a drug in a single cell in three dimensions is demonstrated.

    • Melissa K Passarelli
    • , Alexander Pirkl
    • , Rudolf Moellers
    • , Dmitry Grinfeld
    • , Felix Kollmer
    • , Rasmus Havelund
    • , Carla F Newman
    • , Peter S Marshall
    • , Henrik Arlinghaus
    • , Morgan R Alexander
    • , Andy West
    • , Stevan Horning
    • , Ewald Niehuis
    • , Alexander Makarov
    • , Colin T Dollery
    •  & Ian S Gilmore
  • Research |

    A multistage tandem mass spectrometry approach enables the application of native proteomics to characterize intact endogenous protein complexes in discovery mode, including covalent modifications as well as noncovalently bound cofactors and ligands.

    • Owen S Skinner
    • , Nicole A Haverland
    • , Luca Fornelli
    • , Rafael D Melani
    • , Luis H F Do Vale
    • , Henrique S Seckler
    • , Peter F Doubleday
    • , Luis F Schachner
    • , Kristina Srzentić
    • , Neil L Kelleher
    •  & Philip D Compton
  • Research |

    Quantitative mass spectrometry was used to produce a proteomic survey of postnatal human brain regions. Compared to matched RNA-seq, protein levels showed more regional variation, especially for membrane-associated proteins in the neocortex.

    • Becky C. Carlyle
    • , Robert R. Kitchen
    • , Jean E. Kanyo
    • , Edward Z. Voss
    • , Mihovil Pletikos
    • , André M. M. Sousa
    • , TuKiet T. Lam
    • , Mark B. Gerstein
    • , Nenad Sestan
    •  & Angus C. Nairn
    Nature Neuroscience 20, 1787–1795
  • Research | | open

    The human heart is composed of distinct regions and cell types, but relatively little is known about their specific protein composition. Here, the authors present a region- and cell type-specific proteomic map of the healthy human heart, revealing functional differences and potential cell type markers.

    • Sophia Doll
    • , Martina Dreßen
    • , Philipp E. Geyer
    • , Daniel N. Itzhak
    • , Christian Braun
    • , Stefanie A. Doppler
    • , Florian Meier
    • , Marcus-Andre Deutsch
    • , Harald Lahm
    • , Rüdiger Lange
    • , Markus Krane
    •  & Matthias Mann

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