Marine chemistry

Marine chemistry is the study of the chemical composition and chemical processes of the world’s oceans. Some of the key processes studied are the cycling of: inorganic and organic carbon; nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus; and trace elements, such as iron.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research |

    Microbial degradation is a key process for removing aromatic hydrocarbons from the oceans, according to measurements in plankton and seawater with 64 types of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their microbial degradation genes in four ocean basins.

    • Belén González-Gaya
    • , Alicia Martínez-Varela
    • , Maria Vila-Costa
    • , Paulo Casal
    • , Elena Cerro-Gálvez
    • , Naiara Berrojalbiz
    • , Daniel Lundin
    • , Montserrat Vidal
    • , Carmen Mompeán
    • , Antonio Bode
    • , Begoña Jiménez
    •  & Jordi Dachs
  • Research |

    Glacial meltwater from the Greenland Ice Sheet causes buoyancy-driven upwelling of nutrient-rich, subtropical waters from depth to the continental shelf. This nutrient transport may exceed the direct ice sheet inputs, according to geochemical analyses of transect samples from Sermilik Fjord.

    • Mattias R. Cape
    • , Fiammetta Straneo
    • , Nicholas Beaird
    • , Randelle M. Bundy
    •  & Matthew A. Charette
    Nature Geoscience 12, 34-39
  • Research | | open

    The rare noble gas isotope 39Ar is the ideal tracer to investigate the ventilation of the deep ocean in the time range of 50 to 1000 years. Here the authors constrain transit time distributions in the eastern Tropical Atlantic with 39Ar-measurements done on a sample size of 5 L of water utilising modern atom-optical techniques.

    • Sven Ebser
    • , Arne Kersting
    • , Tim Stöven
    • , Zhongyi Feng
    • , Lisa Ringena
    • , Maximilian Schmidt
    • , Toste Tanhua
    • , Werner Aeschbach
    •  & Markus K. Oberthaler
  • Research | | open

    The Indian Ocean provides a unique environmental gradient to test underlying drivers of the elemental composition of particulate organic matter. Here the authors show that nutrient supply, over temperature and biodiversity changes, controls regional variation of elemental ratios in the tropical Indian Ocean.

    • Catherine A. Garcia
    • , Steven E. Baer
    • , Nathan S. Garcia
    • , Sara Rauschenberg
    • , Benjamin S. Twining
    • , Michael W. Lomas
    •  & Adam C. Martiny
  • Research |

    Ocean acidification will result in biological winners and losers. A mesocosm experiment shows that a toxic algal species is a winner under ocean acidification, with implications for the marine food web and, more generally, ecosystem services.

    • Ulf Riebesell
    • , Nicole Aberle-Malzahn
    • , Eric P. Achterberg
    • , María Algueró-Muñiz
    • , Santiago Alvarez-Fernandez
    • , Javier Arístegui
    • , Lennart T. Bach
    • , Maarten Boersma
    • , Tim Boxhammer
    • , Wanchun Guan
    • , Mathias Haunost
    • , Henriette G. Horn
    • , Carolin R. Löscher
    • , Andrea Ludwig
    • , Carsten Spisla
    • , Michael Sswat
    • , Paul Stange
    •  & Jan Taucher
    Nature Climate Change 8, 1082-1086

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