Intestinal stem cells

Intestinal stem cells are multipotent adult stem cells, which in mammals reside in the base of the crypts of the adult intestine. Intestinal stem cells continuously self-renew by dividing and differentiate into the specialised cells of the intestinal epithelium, which renews throughout life.

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Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research |

    Lineage tracing, biophysical modelling and intestinal transplantation approaches are used to demonstrate that, in the mouse fetal intestinal epithelium, cells are highly plastic with respect to cellular identity and, independent of LGR5 expression and cell position, can contribute to the adult stem cell compartment.

    • Jordi Guiu
    • , Edouard Hannezo
    • , Shiro Yui
    • , Samuel Demharter
    • , Svetlana Ulyanchenko
    • , Martti Maimets
    • , Anne Jørgensen
    • , Signe Perlman
    • , Lene Lundvall
    • , Linn Salto Mamsen
    • , Agnete Larsen
    • , Rasmus H. Olesen
    • , Claus Yding Andersen
    • , Lea Langhoff Thuesen
    • , Kristine Juul Hare
    • , Tune H. Pers
    • , Konstantin Khodosevich
    • , Benjamin D. Simons
    •  & Kim B. Jensen
    Nature, 1-7
  • Research |

    Single-cell transcriptome profiling reveals the presence in the intestinal crypt of revival stem cells, which give rise to crypt-base columnar cells and are essential for repair of the intestinal epithelium following injury.

    • Arshad Ayyaz
    • , Sandeep Kumar
    • , Bruno Sangiorgi
    • , Bibaswan Ghoshal
    • , Jessica Gosio
    • , Shaida Ouladan
    • , Mardi Fink
    • , Seda Barutcu
    • , Daniel Trcka
    • , Jess Shen
    • , Kin Chan
    • , Jeffrey L. Wrana
    •  & Alex Gregorieff
    Nature 569, 121-125
  • Research |

    Single-cell-based imaging and sequencing approaches are used to characterize organoid development and the intestinal regeneration process, which is driven by transient activation of YAP1.

    • Denise Serra
    • , Urs Mayr
    • , Andrea Boni
    • , Ilya Lukonin
    • , Markus Rempfler
    • , Ludivine Challet Meylan
    • , Michael B. Stadler
    • , Petr Strnad
    • , Panagiotis Papasaikas
    • , Dario Vischi
    • , Annick Waldt
    • , Guglielmo Roma
    •  & Prisca Liberali
    Nature 569, 66-72
  • Research | | open

    The histone variant, H2A.Z is known to regulate gene expression and cell proliferation. Here the authors show that H2A.Z has a central role in the control of intestinal epithelial homeostasis in mice, by preventing terminal differentiation of intestinal progenitors.

    • Jérémie Rispal
    • , Lucie Baron
    • , Jean-François Beaulieu
    • , Martine Chevillard-Briet
    • , Didier Trouche
    •  & Fabrice Escaffit
  • Research | | open

    Early life stress has been associated with the occurrence of gastrointestinal diseases later in life, but underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, Wong et al. show that early life stress leads to expansion of intestinal stem cells and their differentiation into serotonin-producing enterochromaffin cells through crosstalk between NGF and Wnt signalling pathways.

    • Hoi Leong Xavier Wong
    • , Hong-yan Qin
    • , Siu Wai Tsang
    • , Xiao Zuo
    • , Sijia Che
    • , Chi Fung Willis Chow
    • , Xi Li
    • , Hai-tao Xiao
    • , Ling Zhao
    • , Tao Huang
    • , Cheng Yuan Lin
    • , Hiu Yee Kwan
    • , Tao Yang
    • , Frank M. Longo
    • , Aiping Lyu
    •  & Zhao-xiang Bian

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