Immune tolerance

Immune tolerance is the state of unresponsiveness of the immune system to substances or tissues that have the potential to induce an immune response. Self tolerance to an individual's own antigens is achieved through both central tolerance and peripheral tolerance mechanisms.

Latest Research and Reviews

News and Comment

  • Comments and Opinion |

    Numerous exciting studies that advanced our understanding of immune-mediated kidney disease were published in 2018. Whereas most of these studies analysed the role of pro-inflammatory mediators, several novel anti-inflammatory mechanisms were discovered that involve immune cells and mediators with previously unrecognized protective roles in renal disease.

    • Christian Kurts
    •  & Catherine Meyer-Schwesinger
  • News and Views |

    The mechanism of action of the lymphocyte checkpoint protein LAG-3 was always rather mysterious. It now seems to operate at least in part by recognizing and suppressing responses to stable complexes of peptide and major histocompatibility complex class II.

    • Yuan Lui
    •  & Simon J. Davis
    Nature Immunology 19, 1278-1279
  • Research Highlights |

    Two papers published in Nature introduce a new subset of medullary thymic epithelial cells with properties similar to intestinal tuft cells, including IL-25 production and chemosensing ability.

    • Kirsty Minton
  • Research Highlights |

    Jeffrey Bluestone describes a 1987 study of anergic T cells by Marc Jenkins and Ron Schwartz that altered his thoughts about T cell tolerance and eventually gave birth to the field of checkpoint inhibition.

    • Jeffrey A. Bluestone