Forestry

Forestry is the study and practice of the cultivation and management of woodland. Forests provide goods and services such as timber, recreation and carbon sequestration.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research |

    Since the early 1980s, remotely sensed data has shown the Earth to be slowly greening. Climate change, CO2 fertilization and land-use change are competing explanations. Using satellite data from 2000–2017, this study finds striking greening of both China and India, driven primarily by land-use change, with forest growth and cropland intensification more important in China and cropland more important in India.

    • Chi Chen
    • , Taejin Park
    • , Xuhui Wang
    • , Shilong Piao
    • , Baodong Xu
    • , Rajiv K. Chaturvedi
    • , Richard Fuchs
    • , Victor Brovkin
    • , Philippe Ciais
    • , Rasmus Fensholt
    • , Hans Tømmervik
    • , Govindasamy Bala
    • , Zaichun Zhu
    • , Ramakrishna R. Nemani
    •  & Ranga B. Myneni
  • Research | | open

    Changing rainfall patterns may drive changes in the structure of tropical savanna. Here Zhang et al. use satellite data from global tropical savannas, and find evidence to suggest that altered rainfall may be favouring woody plants over herbaceous plants in these ecosystems.

    • Wenmin Zhang
    • , Martin Brandt
    • , Josep Penuelas
    • , Françoise Guichard
    • , Xiaoye Tong
    • , Feng Tian
    •  & Rasmus Fensholt
  • Research |

    Ecosystem services from forests depend on the species therein, but the type of species diversity may also determine the level of services that the forest can provide. Swedish national forest data show that while mixed stands often provide more services than monoculture forests, it is the relative abundance of species within the mix that can be the key determinant, and necessary for understanding in forest management.

    • Micael Jonsson
    • , Jan Bengtsson
    • , Lars Gamfeldt
    • , Jon Moen
    •  & Tord Snäll
    Nature Plants 5, 141-147
  • Research |

    Capacity for carbon capture and storage in forests may not be monolithic but instead a function of complex dynamics of forest strata and age. The smaller trees that make up the understory in African tropical forests store their carbon longer as compared to sub-canopy and canopy trees and they represent a disproportionately large share of the carbon sink, in spite of their small size.

    • Wannes Hubau
    • , Tom De Mil
    • , Jan Van den Bulcke
    • , Oliver L. Phillips
    • , Bhély Angoboy Ilondea
    • , Joris Van Acker
    • , Martin J. P. Sullivan
    • , Laurent Nsenga
    • , Benjamin Toirambe
    • , Camille Couralet
    • , Lindsay F. Banin
    • , Serge K. Begne
    • , Timothy R. Baker
    • , Nils Bourland
    • , Eric Chezeaux
    • , Connie J. Clark
    • , Murray Collins
    • , James A. Comiskey
    • , Aida Cuni-Sanchez
    • , Victor Deklerck
    • , Sofie Dierickx
    • , Jean-Louis Doucet
    • , Corneille E. N. Ewango
    • , Ted R. Feldpausch
    • , Martin Gilpin
    • , Christelle Gonmadje
    • , Jefferson S. Hall
    • , David J. Harris
    • , Olivier J. Hardy
    • , Marie-Noel D. Kamdem
    • , Emmanuel Kasongo Yakusu
    • , Gabriela Lopez-Gonzalez
    • , Jean-Remy Makana
    • , Yadvinder Malhi
    • , Faustin M. Mbayu
    • , Sam Moore
    • , Jacques Mukinzi
    • , Georgia Pickavance
    • , John R. Poulsen
    • , Jan Reitsma
    • , Mélissa Rousseau
    • , Bonaventure Sonké
    • , Terry Sunderland
    • , Hermann Taedoumg
    • , Joey Talbot
    • , John Tshibamba Mukendi
    • , Peter M. Umunay
    • , Jason Vleminckx
    • , Lee J. T. White
    • , Lise Zemagho
    • , Simon L. Lewis
    •  & Hans Beeckman
    Nature Plants 5, 133-140

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