Electronic materials

Electronic materials are materials studied and used mainly for their electrical properties. The electric response of materials largely stems from the dynamics of electrons, and their interplay with atoms and molecules. A material can be classified as a conductor, semiconductor or insulator according to its response to an external electric field.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    Understanding the energetic driving force is important for optimizing the performance of organic solar cells. Here Nakano et al. suggest that the dominant driving force is the energy difference between the singlet excited state and the charge transfer state after assessing 16 material combinations.

    • Kyohei Nakano
    • , Yujiao Chen
    • , Bo Xiao
    • , Weining Han
    • , Jianming Huang
    • , Hiroyuki Yoshida
    • , Erjun Zhou
    •  & Keisuke Tajima
  • Research | | open

    While hydrogen as a renewable fuel can be produced from water, there is a scarcity of metal-free materials that serve as effective electrocatalysts. Here, authors functionalize carbon fiber cloth with amides to improve hydrogen evolution activities in both acid and alkaline water.

    • Yurui Xue
    • , Lan Hui
    • , Huidi Yu
    • , Yuxin Liu
    • , Yan Fang
    • , Bolong Huang
    • , Yingjie Zhao
    • , Zhibo Li
    •  & Yuliang Li
  • Research |

    The stability of both colloidal quantum dots and perovskites can be improved by combining them into a hybrid material in which matched lattice parameters suppress the formation of undesired phases.

    • Mengxia Liu
    • , Yuelang Chen
    • , Chih-Shan Tan
    • , Rafael Quintero-Bermudez
    • , Andrew H. Proppe
    • , Rahim Munir
    • , Hairen Tan
    • , Oleksandr Voznyy
    • , Benjamin Scheffel
    • , Grant Walters
    • , Andrew Pak Tao Kam
    • , Bin Sun
    • , Min-Jae Choi
    • , Sjoerd Hoogland
    • , Aram Amassian
    • , Shana O. Kelley
    • , F. Pelayo García de Arquer
    •  & Edward H. Sargent
    Nature 570, 96-101
  • Reviews |

    3D printing technology emerged as a tool for the design and fabrication of prototypes. Chemists are now using this technology to produce chemically reactive materials. In this Review, Hartings and Ahmed discuss different approaches to 3D print chemically reactive objects.

    • Matthew R. Hartings
    •  & Zeeshan Ahmed

News and Comment

  • Research Highlights |

    Atomically thin materials that are both electrically conductive and magnetic are highly desirable. Pedersen, Clérac and co-workers report a new layered coordination polymer — CrCl2(pyrazine)2 — that exhibits both conductive and magnetic-type properties.

    • Gabriella Graziano
  • News and Views |

    By inserting potassium into a 3D metal–organic framework band delocalization occurs, enabling mobilities and conductivities similar to organic polymers.

    • A. Alec Talin
    •  & François Léonard
    Nature Materials 17, 570-571
  • News and Views |

    Unlike conventional inorganic semiconductors, which are typically brittle, α-Ag2S exhibits room-temperature ductility with favourable electrical properties, offering promise for use in high-performance flexible and stretchable devices.

    • Dae-Hyeong Kim
    •  & Gi Doo Cha
    Nature Materials 17, 388-389