Electroencephalography – EEG

Electroencephalography (EEG) is a method for monitoring electrical activity in the brain. It uses electrodes placed on or below the scalp to record activity with coarse spatial but high temporal resolution. EEG can be used in cognitive research or to diagnose conditions such as epilepsy and sleep disorders.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    Electroencephalography (EEG) allows the measurement of electrical signals associated with brain activity, but it is unclear if EEG can accurately measure subcortical activity. Here, the authors show that source dynamics, reconstructed from scalp EEG, correlate with activity recorded from human thalamus and nucleus accumbens.

    • Martin Seeber
    • , Lucia-Manuela Cantonas
    • , Mauritius Hoevels
    • , Thibaut Sesia
    • , Veerle Visser-Vandewalle
    •  & Christoph M. Michel
  • Research | | open

    • Anahit Babayan
    • , Miray Erbey
    • , Deniz Kumral
    • , Janis D. Reinelt
    • , Andrea M. F. Reiter
    • , Josefin Röbbig
    • , H. Lina Schaare
    • , Marie Uhlig
    • , Alfred Anwander
    • , Pierre-Louis Bazin
    • , Annette Horstmann
    • , Leonie Lampe
    • , Vadim V. Nikulin
    • , Hadas Okon-Singer
    • , Sven Preusser
    • , André Pampel
    • , Christiane S. Rohr
    • , Julia Sacher
    • , Angelika Thöne-Otto
    • , Sabrina Trapp
    • , Till Nierhaus
    • , Denise Altmann
    • , Katrin Arelin
    • , Maria Blöchl
    • , Edith Bongartz
    • , Patric Breig
    • , Elena Cesnaite
    • , Sufang Chen
    • , Roberto Cozatl
    • , Saskia Czerwonatis
    • , Gabriele Dambrauskaite
    • , Maria Dreyer
    • , Jessica Enders
    • , Melina Engelhardt
    • , Marie Michele Fischer
    • , Norman Forschack
    • , Johannes Golchert
    • , Laura Golz
    • , C. Alexandrina Guran
    • , Susanna Hedrich
    • , Nicole Hentschel
    • , Daria I. Hoffmann
    • , Julia M. Huntenburg
    • , Rebecca Jost
    • , Anna Kosatschek
    • , Stella Kunzendorf
    • , Hannah Lammers
    • , Mark E. Lauckner
    • , Keyvan Mahjoory
    • , Ahmad S. Kanaan
    • , Natacha Mendes
    • , Ramona Menger
    • , Enzo Morino
    • , Karina Näthe
    • , Jennifer Neubauer
    • , Handan Noyan
    • , Sabine Oligschläger
    • , Patricia Panczyszyn-Trzewik
    • , Dorothee Poehlchen
    • , Nadine Putzke
    • , Sabrina Roski
    • , Marie-Catherine Schaller
    • , Anja Schieferbein
    • , Benito Schlaak
    • , Robert Schmidt
    • , Krzysztof J. Gorgolewski
    • , Hanna Maria Schmidt
    • , Anne Schrimpf
    • , Sylvia Stasch
    • , Maria Voss
    • , Annett Wiedemann
    • , Daniel S. Margulies
    • , Michael Gaebler
    •  & Arno Villringer
    Scientific Data 6, 180308
  • Research | | open

    Direct electrical brain stimulation can induce widespread changes in neural activity, offering a means to modulate network-wide activity and treat disease. Here, the authors show that the low-frequency functional connectivity profile of a stimulation target predicts where induced theta activity occurs.

    • E. A. Solomon
    • , J. E. Kragel
    • , R. Gross
    • , B. Lega
    • , M. R. Sperling
    • , G. Worrell
    • , S. A. Sheth
    • , K. A. Zaghloul
    • , B. C. Jobst
    • , J. M. Stein
    • , S. Das
    • , R. Gorniak
    • , C. S. Inman
    • , S. Seger
    • , D. S. Rizzuto
    •  & M. J. Kahana

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