Early solar system

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    It remains controversial whether or not impact melt sheets produced by asteroid impacts were able to undergo large-scale igneous differentiation. Here the authors present evidence for large igneous differentiation in one of these sheets and argue that this process has contributed to the evolution and lithological diversity of the proto-crusts on terrestrial planets.

    • Rais Latypov
    • , Sofya Chistyakova
    • , Richard Grieve
    •  & Hannu Huhma
  • Research |

    Using a pair of modest telescopes, Arimatsu et al. have observed an occultation event that purports to have been caused by a kilometre-sized Kuiper belt object (KBO). KBOs of this order of magnitude in size have not been detected before, but are likely to represent the most populous size of object in the Kuiper belt.

    • K. Arimatsu
    • , K. Tsumura
    • , F. Usui
    • , Y. Shinnaka
    • , K. Ichikawa
    • , T. Ootsubo
    • , T. Kotani
    • , T. Wada
    • , K. Nagase
    •  & J. Watanabe
  • Research |

    Infrared and neutron spectroscopic observations by Dawn give contrasting results on the elemental composition of Ceres’s surface, which can be reconciled by assuming that Ceres’s surface contains ~20 wt% of carbon, coming from impacts by carbonaceous asteroids and/or generated by extensive aqueous alteration.

    • S. Marchi
    • , A. Raponi
    • , T. H. Prettyman
    • , M. C. De Sanctis
    • , J. Castillo-Rogez
    • , C. A. Raymond
    • , E. Ammannito
    • , T. Bowling
    • , M. Ciarniello
    • , H. Kaplan
    • , E. Palomba
    • , C. T. Russell
    • , V. Vinogradoff
    •  & N. Yamashita
    Nature Astronomy 3, 140-145
  • Research |

    The Patroclus–Menoetius Jupiter Trojan binary could survive its travel from the Kuiper belt to Jupiter’s orbit only if the giant planets’ migrations happened within ~100 Myr after the birth of the Solar System and not after ~700 Myr, as suggested instead by the Late Heavy Bombardment.

    • David Nesvorný
    • , David Vokrouhlický
    • , William F. Bottke
    •  & Harold F. Levison
    Nature Astronomy 2, 878-882
  • Research |

    Cosmochemical evidence is used to constrain models of Jupiter formation, which unfolds in three distinct phases: a rapid pebble accretion during the first Myr, followed by a slower growth controlled by larger planetesimals, ending in a runaway gas accretion stage.

    • Yann Alibert
    • , Julia Venturini
    • , Ravit Helled
    • , Sareh Ataiee
    • , Remo Burn
    • , Luc Senecal
    • , Willy Benz
    • , Lucio Mayer
    • , Christoph Mordasini
    • , Sascha P. Quanz
    •  & Maria Schönbächler
    Nature Astronomy 2, 873-877

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