DNA nanomachines

DNA nanomachines are nanorobots made entirely or partially of DNA. DNA nanomachines can switch between defined molecular conformations and can be used as sensing, computing, actuating or therapeutic nanodevices.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    Strand displacement is commonly used in DNA nanotechnology to program dynamic interactions between individual DNA strands. Here, the authors describe a tile displacement principle that is similar in concept but occurs on a larger structural level: the displacement reactions take place between DNA origami tiles, allowing reconfiguration of entire systems of interacting DNA structures.

    • Philip Petersen
    • , Grigory Tikhomirov
    •  & Lulu Qian
  • Protocols |

    This protocol describes how to design and assemble two-dimensional reconfigurable DNA arrays that can be used for long-range information relay. The procedure describes the design principles and AFM- and TEM-based imaging of the structures.

    • Dongfang Wang
    • , Jie Song
    • , Pengfei Wang
    • , Victor Pan
    • , Yingwei Zhang
    • , Daxiang Cui
    •  & Yonggang Ke
    Nature Protocols 13, 2312-2329
  • Research |

    DNA origami-based integrated gene transcription modules enable the rational design of transcription activity. Architectural modalities between gene and RNA polymerase allow the autonomous response to various signals with reprogrammable logic gates.

    • Takeya Masubuchi
    • , Masayuki Endo
    • , Ryo Iizuka
    • , Ayaka Iguchi
    • , Dong Hyun Yoon
    • , Tetsushi Sekiguchi
    • , Hao Qi
    • , Ryosuke Iinuma
    • , Yuya Miyazono
    • , Shuichi Shoji
    • , Takashi Funatsu
    • , Hiroshi Sugiyama
    • , Yoshie Harada
    • , Takuya Ueda
    •  & Hisashi Tadakuma
    Nature Nanotechnology 13, 933-940
  • Research | | open

    DNA molecular machines hold promise for biological nanotechnology, but how to actuate them in a fast and programmable manner remains challenging. Here, Lauback et al. demonstrate direct manipulation of DNA origami assemblies via a micrometer-long stiff mechanical lever controlled by a magnetic field.

    • Stephanie Lauback
    • , Kara R. Mattioli
    • , Alexander E. Marras
    • , Maxim Armstrong
    • , Thomas P. Rudibaugh
    • , Ratnasingham Sooryakumar
    •  & Carlos E. Castro

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