Dental education

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research |

    Introduction Dental nurses traditionally train in either hospitals or practices. A London pilot scheme provided exposure to both settings to explore the potential for dual training. This evaluation examined the motivation, experiences, career expectations and initial careers of trainees. Methods A questionnaire-based survey at two time points during the training. Descriptive and inferential analysis conducted using SPSS version 22. Results Overall training was rated highly (7–9) by 100% of trainees with positive views of the concept of dual training. There was also a preference for full-time work in primary care with career decisions strongly influenced by personal factors – financial stability, work-life balance and professional development. Rotating between settings proved challenging so did perceived low wages; lowest job satisfaction scores were for physical working conditions and remuneration. However, advantages included high levels of preparedness for team-working with most recognising the dental team has shared responsibilities. A high proportion of trainees were employed in primary care (57.8%) post-qualification. Strong interests in gaining further qualifications were reported (92.3%). Conclusion The outcome was generally positive with evidence of academic success, employability, commitment to a career in dental nursing and sufficient support for training in multiple settings to be introduced into future dental nurse training.

    • O. Awojobi
    • , S. Movahedi
    • , E. Jones
    •  & J. E. Gallagher
    BDJ Team 5, 18102
  • Research |

    Send your letters to the Editor, British Dental Journal, 64 Wimpole Street, London, W1G 8YS. bdj@bda.org. Priority will be given to letters less than 500 words long. Authors must sign the letter, which may be edited for reasons of space. Readers may now comment on letters via the BDJ website ( www.bdj.co.uk ). A 'Readers' Comments' section appears at the end of the full text of each letter online.

    • G. Jones
    British Dental Journal 223, 744-745
  • Research |

    Send your letters to the Editor, British Dental Journal, 64 Wimpole Street, London, W1G 8YS. bdj@bda.org. Priority will be given to letters less than 500 words long. Authors must sign the letter, which may be edited for reasons of space. Readers may now comment on letters via the BDJ website ( www.bdj.co.uk ). A 'Readers' Comments' section appears at the end of the full text of each letter online.

    • A. Babu Santosh
    •  & C. Gabbadon

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