Coordination chemistry

Coordination chemistry is the study of compounds that have a central atom (often metallic) surrounded by molecules or anions, known as ligands. The ligands are attached to the central atom by dative bonds, also known as coordinate bonds, in which both electrons in the bond are supplied by the same atom on the ligand.

Latest Research and Reviews

News and Comment

  • Research Highlights |

    Particle swarm optimization allows one to search vast compositional space for new viable species. Additionally, simulating high pressures has enabled the prediction of hypervalent species such as IF8.

    • David Schilter
  • Research Highlights |

    Facile isotopic labelling of carbon has been demonstrated using Pd-catalysed exchange of an acid chloride carbonyl with carbon monoxide.

    • Stephen G. Davey
  • News and Views |

    By combining metal ions, organic linkers and polymers, ordered frameworks with controlled crystallite size can form. When fabricated into membranes, they combine superlative CO2/N2 separation properties with good hydrolytic stability.

    • Joshua D. Moon
    •  & Benny D. Freeman
    Nature Materials 18, 92-93
  • News and Views |

    Indirect methods are generally adopted to elucidate complicated mechanisms of transition metal catalysis. Now, a way to directly observe transient manganese species and monitor key reaction steps has been established by using time-resolved multiple-probe spectroscopy.

    • Congyang Wang
    Nature Catalysis 1, 816-817
  • Research Highlights |

    Certain frustrated Lewis pairs can undergo single electron transfer to give frustrated radical pairs. Such radical pairs have been implicated as important species in the activation of small molecules such as dihydrogen.

    • David Schilter
  • Research Highlights |

    Atomically thin materials that are both electrically conductive and magnetic are highly desirable. Pedersen, Clérac and co-workers report a new layered coordination polymer — CrCl2(pyrazine)2 — that exhibits both conductive and magnetic-type properties.

    • Gabriella Graziano