Cell migration

Cell migration is the process by which cells move from one location to another by adopting different motility modes, such as mesenchymal, amoeboid or collective migration. Cell motility is observed in unicellular organisms, is essential for the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms, and is also involved in immune responses and pathological conditions.

Latest Research and Reviews

News and Comment

  • Research Highlights |

    In a study published in Nature Medicine, Malehmir et al. have identified how platelet recruitment contributes to the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma in response to high-fat diets in mice.

    • Ulrike Harjes
  • Research Highlights |

    Elia et al. show that breast cancer cells in the lung metastatic niche are dependent on pyruvate uptake to promote extracellular matrix remodelling and metastatic growth, which can be targeted therapeutically.

    • Ulrike Harjes
  • News and Views |

    A two-state hopping experiment combined with a dynamical systems model reveals that cancer cells are deterministically driven across barriers, whereas normal cells cross only with the help of stochastic fluctuations.

    • Ulrich S. Schwarz
    Nature Physics 15, 524-525
  • News and Views |

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is crucial for development, and for dissemination and invasion of cancer cells. A study now identifies the apical–basolateral polarity status of epithelia as a checkpoint for EMT induction and tumour metastasis through aPKC–Par3-regulated degradation of the EMT transcription factor SNAI1.

    • Oana-Diana Persa
    •  & Carien M. Niessen
    Nature Cell Biology 21, 299-300