Cancer microenvironment

The cancer microenvironment, or tumour microenvironment, describes the non-cancerous cells present in the tumour. These include fibroblasts, immune cells and cells that comprise the blood vessels. It also includes the proteins produced by all of the cells present in the tumour that support the growth of the cancer cells.

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Latest Research and Reviews

News and Comment

  • News and Views |

    Macrophages modulate mammary tumour response to chemotherapy. A new study shows that targeted elimination of macrophages elicits a type I interferon response in the tumour microenvironment that enhances the efficacy of platinum- but not taxane-based chemotherapy, underscoring complex regulatory roles for macrophages in chemotherapy-treated tumours.

    • Michele De Palma
    • , Sina Nassiri
    •  & Chiara Cianciaruso
  • News and Views |

    Glioblastoma remains essentially incurable, and new therapeutic approaches are urgently needed. Now, the findings of three serial tissue-based studies suggest that immune-checkpoint inhibition can modify the glioblastoma microenvironment. Following these encouraging observations, the results of two phase III trials of immune-checkpoint inhibition in newly diagnosed glioblastoma, with larger cohorts of patients, are eagerly anticipated.

    • Michael Weller
    •  & Emilie Le Rhun
  • Research Highlights |

    Miller, Sen et al. show that exhausted T cells in tumours contain distinct subpopulations, one of which is long-lived and persistent and, in response to immune checkpoint blockade, can give rise to short-lived cytotoxic T cells that exert tumour control.

    • Ulrike Harjes
  • Research Highlights |

    Lee et al. show that in a mouse model of melanoma, tumour cells that spread to the draining lymph node adapt to the fatty acid-rich environment in the lymph node by activation of YAP signalling and fatty acid oxidation.

    • Ulrike Harjes
  • Research Highlights |

    Two independent studies have advanced our understanding of local microbiota immunomodulation and provided insight into how potential manipulation of microbial composition could transform treatment strategies for patients with cancer.

    • Anna Dart