Bone metastases

Bone metastases are cancers that have spread (metastasized) from other tissues in the body through the blood or lymphatic systems to the bone marrow. Bone metastases form the main type of bone cancer and, in descending order of frequency, originate from: breast, prostate, lung, colon, stomach, bladder, uterus, rectum, thyroid and kidney.

Latest Research and Reviews

News and Comment

  • Research Highlights |

    Wang et al. demonstrate that increased flux of calcium derived from osteogenic cells into cancer cells promotes early-stage bone colonization. Calcium signalling in cancer cells can be targeted by arsenic trioxide, thereby reducing bone metastasis progression.

    • Ulrike Harjes
  • News and Views |

    Dose-intensified radiotherapy is widely used in prostate cancer treatment but its effect on distant metastasis and overall survival is unclear. A large randomized clinical trial to evaluate the role of external-beam-based dose intensification without androgen deprivation therapy in intermediate-risk disease shows that dose escalation can reduce distant metastases.

    • Pirus Ghadjar
    •  & Thomas Wiegel
  • Research Highlights |

    Mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 1 (MSK1) has been identified as an epigenetic modulator of luminal gene expression in breast cancer, maintaining latency of bone micrometastases.

    • Ulrike Harjes
  • News and Views |

    Advances in understanding of prostate cancer biology and improved treatment options have changed management of metastatic prostate cancer. Escape of the malignancy from the prostatic capsule no longer means that treatment is focused on limiting systemic spread, and data suggest that local treatment of the prostate is beneficial, even in men whose tumour has spread.

    • Fred Saad