Biomaterials

Biomaterials are those materials — be it natural or synthetic, alive or lifeless, and usually made of multiple components — that interact with biological systems. Biomaterials are often used in medical applications to augment or replace a natural function.

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  • News and Views |

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that accumulate on surfaces such as replacement joints or intravenous catheters. By silencing a key communication system, Staphylococcus aureus builds tightly packed biofilms that can withstand attack by host immune cells.

    • Andrew M. Edwards
    Nature Microbiology 4, 1073-1074
  • Editorial |

    The first clinical success of immunotherapeutics for cancer treatment and the appreciation that tissue regeneration can be greatly improved by precisely and locally modulating the immune response are evidence that immunotherapy is poised to revolutionize the way we treat disease.

  • News and Views |

    In biological systems, order typically emerges from out-of-equilibrium molecular processes that control both static patterns and dynamic changes. Now, the self-regulating assembly and disassembly of a synthetic system has been achieved on the micrometre scale, by coupling the growth of a DNA nanotube to a biochemical oscillator.

    • Tim Liedl
    Nature Chemistry 11, 497-499