Automation

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    The software Optimer has aided the programmable one-pot oligosaccharide synthesis with a library of 50 Building BLocks (BBLs). Here, the authors expanded Optimer's validated and virtual libraries of BBLs and developed Auto-CHO, a software which allows the one-pot programmable synthesis of more complex glycans.

    • Cheng-Wei Cheng
    • , Yixuan Zhou
    • , Wen-Harn Pan
    • , Supriya Dey
    • , Chung-Yi Wu
    • , Wen-Lian Hsu
    •  & Chi-Huey Wong
  • Research | | open

    Flow-based peptide synthesis is a well-established method, yet difficult to combine with native chemical ligation (NCL), the go-to method for peptide cyclization. Here, the authors developed a microfluidic procedure for peptide cyclization within minutes, using NCL and an SEA alkylthioester peptide.

    • Nathalie Ollivier
    • , Thomas Toupy
    • , Ruben C. Hartkoorn
    • , Rémi Desmet
    • , Jean-Christophe M. Monbaliu
    •  & Oleg Melnyk
  • Reviews |

    The discovery and development of advanced materials are imperative for the clean energy sector. We envision that a closed-loop approach, which combines high-throughput computation, artificial intelligence and advanced robotics, will sizeably reduce the time to deployment and the costs associated with materials development.

    • Daniel P. Tabor
    • , Loïc M. Roch
    • , Semion K. Saikin
    • , Christoph Kreisbeck
    • , Dennis Sheberla
    • , Joseph H. Montoya
    • , Shyam Dwaraknath
    • , Muratahan Aykol
    • , Carlos Ortiz
    • , Hermann Tribukait
    • , Carlos Amador-Bedolla
    • , Christoph J. Brabec
    • , Benji Maruyama
    • , Kristin A. Persson
    •  & Alán Aspuru-Guzik
  • Research |

    Deep neural networks and Monte Carlo tree search can plan chemical syntheses by training models on a huge database of published reactions; their predicted synthetic routes cannot be distinguished from those a human chemist would design.

    • Marwin H. S. Segler
    • , Mike Preuss
    •  & Mark P. Waller
    Nature 555, 604-610
  • Research | | open

    For many applications, positron emission tomography tracers must be produced with high specific activity. Here the authors identify variables leading to increased specific activity when tracers are synthesized in microliter volumes, and show that specific activity can influence tracer biodistribution.

    • Maxim Sergeev
    • , Mark Lazari
    • , Federica Morgia
    • , Jeffrey Collins
    • , Muhammad Rashed Javed
    • , Olga Sergeeva
    • , Jason Jones
    • , Michael E. Phelps
    • , Jason T. Lee
    • , Pei Yuin Keng
    •  & R. Michael van Dam

News and Comment

  • Research Highlights |

    Controlling shape and size of noble-metal nanocrystals in an automated fashion is highly desirable for large-scale production of nanomaterials. Younan Xia and co-workers propose the design of a device for the automated synthesis of uniform nanocrystals, featuring a droplet reactor, online separation and purification capabilities.

    • Gabriella Graziano
  • Comments and Opinion |

    Developing cleaner chemical processes often involves sophisticated flow-chemistry equipment that is not available in many economically developing countries. For reactions where it is the data that are important rather than the physical product, the networking of chemists across the internet to allow remote experimentation offers a viable solution to this problem.

    • Ryan A. Skilton
    • , Richard A. Bourne
    • , Zacharias Amara
    • , Raphael Horvath
    • , Jing Jin
    • , Michael J. Scully
    • , Emilia Streng
    • , Samantha L. Y. Tang
    • , Peter A. Summers
    • , Jiawei Wang
    • , Eduardo Pérez
    • , Nigist Asfaw
    • , Guilherme L. P. Aydos
    • , Jairton Dupont
    • , Gurbuz Comak
    • , Michael W. George
    •  & Martyn Poliakoff
  • News and Views |

    Creating chemical systems that can model living systems is far from easy. However, the evolution of oil droplets in water through the application of artificial selective pressure to produce droplets with dramatically different — yet specific — behaviours, is an encouraging step in this direction.

    • Andrew J. Bissette
    •  & Stephen P. Fletcher
    Nature Chemistry 7, 15-17