Acute inflammation

Definition

Acute inflammation is a short-term process occurring in response to tissue injury, usually appearing within minutes or hours. It is characterized by five cardinal signs: pain, redness, immobility (loss of function), swelling and heat.

Latest Research and Reviews

News and Comment

  • Comments and Opinion |

    Netea and colleagues provide a general guide to the cellular and humoral contributors to inflammation as well as the pathways that characterize inflammation in specific organs and tissues.

    • Mihai G Netea
    • , Frances Balkwill
    • , Michel Chonchol
    • , Fabio Cominelli
    • , Marc Y Donath
    • , Evangelos J Giamarellos-Bourboulis
    • , Douglas Golenbock
    • , Mark S Gresnigt
    • , Michael T Heneka
    • , Hal M Hoffman
    • , Richard Hotchkiss
    • , Leo A B Joosten
    • , Daniel L Kastner
    • , Martin Korte
    • , Eicke Latz
    • , Peter Libby
    • , Thomas Mandrup-Poulsen
    • , Alberto Mantovani
    • , Kingston H G Mills
    • , Kristen L Nowak
    • , Luke A O'Neill
    • , Peter Pickkers
    • , Tom van der Poll
    • , Paul M Ridker
    • , Joost Schalkwijk
    • , David A Schwartz
    • , Britta Siegmund
    • , Clifford J Steer
    • , Herbert Tilg
    • , Jos W M van der Meer
    • , Frank L van de Veerdonk
    •  & Charles A Dinarello
    Nature Immunology 18, 826–831
  • News and Views |

    Chemokines are important components of the hematopoietic niche. The atypical chemokine receptor 1 (ACKR1), expressed on erythrocyte precursors, regulates myeloid differentiation.

    • Massimo Locati
    • , Alberto Mantovani
    •  & Raffaella Bonecchi
    Nature Immunology 18, 711–712
  • News and Views |

    Sentinel macrophages in the lymph node provide a first line of defense against invading viruses. A new study visualizes inflammasome activation in virally infected nodal macrophages in mice and shows that this activation augments both innate and adaptive immunity.

    • Heather D Hickman
    Nature Medicine 22, 22–23