Spinal Cord
SEARCH     advanced search my account e-alerts subscribe register
Journal home
Advance online publication
Current issue
Archive
Press releases
For authors
For referees
Contact editorial office
About the journal
For librarians
Subscribe
Advertising
naturereprints
Contact NPG
Customer services
Site features
NPG Subject areas
Access material from all our publications in your subject area:
Biotechnology Biotechnology
Cancer Cancer
Chemistry Chemistry
Dentistry Dentistry
Development Development
Drug Discovery Drug Discovery
Earth Sciences Earth Sciences
Evolution & Ecology Evolution & Ecology
Genetics Genetics
Immunology Immunology
Materials Materials Science
Medical Research Medical Research
Microbiology Microbiology
Molecular Cell Biology Molecular Cell Biology
Neuroscience Neuroscience
Pharmacology Pharmacology
Physics Physics
Browse all publications
 
September 2000, Volume 38, Number 9, Pages 538-540
Table of contents    Previous  Abstract  Next   Article  PDF
Article
Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy for acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury
S Asamoto1, H Sugiyama1, H Doi1, M Iida1, T Nagao2 and K Matsumoto3

1Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Metropolitan Ebara Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

2Department of Neurology, Tokyo Metropolitan Ebara Hospital, Tokyo, Japan

3Department of Neurosurgery, Showa University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan

Correspondence to: S Asamoto, Department of Neurosurgery, Tokyo Metropolitan Ebara Hospital, 4-5-10 Higashi-Yukigaya, Ohta-Ku, Tokyo 145-0065, Japan

Abstract

Study design: A retrospective study of spinal cord injury (SCI) treated with and without hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy.

Objectives: To report on the use of HBO in spinal cord injury.

Setting: Neurosurgical Unit, Tokyo, Japan.

Methods: Thirty-four cases of hyperextension spinal cord injury without bone damage and previous history of surgical intervention were divided into two groups, with (HBO) or without (non-HBO) therapy. The neurological findings at admission and their outcomes were evaluated by means of Neurological Cervical Spine Scale (NCSS) and the average improvement rates in individual groups were compared.

Results: The improvement rate ranged from 100% to 27.3% with the mean value of 75.2% in the HBO group, while these values were 100%, 25.0% and 65.1% respectively in the non HBO group.

Conclusion: In the HBO group, the improvement rate indicated effectiveness in acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

Spinal Cord (2000) 38, 538-540.

Keywords

hyperbaric oxygen therapy; trauma; acute spinal cord injury

September 2000, Volume 38, Number 9, Pages 538-540
Table of contents    Previous  Abstract  Next   Article  PDF