Review

Nature Reviews Neuroscience 7, 268-277 (April 2006) | doi:10.1038/nrn1884

Meeting of minds: the medial frontal cortex and social cognition

David M. Amodio1 & Chris D. Frith2  About the authors

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Social interaction is a cornerstone of human life, yet the neural mechanisms underlying social cognition are poorly understood. Recently, research that integrates approaches from neuroscience and social psychology has begun to shed light on these processes, and converging evidence from neuroimaging studies suggests a unique role for the medial frontal cortex. We review the emerging literature that relates social cognition to the medial frontal cortex and, on the basis of anatomical and functional characteristics of this brain region, propose a theoretical model of medial frontal cortical function relevant to different aspects of social cognitive processing.

Author affiliations

  1. Department of Psychology, New York University, 6 Washington Place, New York 10003, USA.
    Email: david.amodio@nyu.edu
  2. Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK.
    Email: cfrith@fil.ion.ucl.ac.uk

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