Review

Nature Reviews Neuroscience 5, 483-494 (June 2004) | doi:10.1038/nrn1406

Dopamine, learning and motivation

Roy A. Wise1  About the author

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The hypothesis that dopamine is important for reward has been proposed in a number of forms, each of which has been challenged. Normally, rewarding stimuli such as food, water, lateral hypothalamic brain stimulation and several drugs of abuse become ineffective as rewards in animals given performance-sparing doses of dopamine antagonists. Dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens has been linked to the efficacy of these unconditioned rewards, but dopamine release in a broader range of structures is implicated in the 'stamping-in' of memory that attaches motivational importance to otherwise neutral environmental stimuli.

Author affiliations

  1. Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
    Email: rwise@intra.nida.nih.gov

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