Insight


Nature Physics Insight – Dark Matter


Dark matter makes up most of the Universe, but very little is known about it. This joint Nature Astronomy and Nature Physics Insight explores the history and current status of dark matter searches in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology.

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Editorial

Light in darkness

doi:10.1038/s41550-017-0082

We think dark matter exists because measurements of 'normal' matter would not otherwise make sense. In this Insight on dark matter — offered jointly by Nature Astronomy and Nature Physics — we showcase the various techniques trying to make sense of it.


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Interview

Exploring the dark Universe

doi:10.1038/s41550017-0066

Joshua Frieman, co-founder and director of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration, tells us about the ambitious project aiming to probe the origin of cosmic acceleration.


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Perspective

Growth of the nonbaryonic dark matter theory

P. J. E. Peebles

doi:10.1038/s41550-017-0057

From the first hints of unseen matter in the Universe to the present body of evidence for dark matter, James Peebles outlines the significant developments in observation and theory, including how community opinion evolved during the 1970s.


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Progress Articles

Dark matter detection at colliders

Oliver Buchmueller, Caterina Doglioni and Lian-TaoWang

doi:10.1038/nphys4054

Beyond the standard model, the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) hypothesis for dark matter is one of the most compelling, and the one being tested at the Large Hadron Collider.

Current status of direct dark matter detection experiments

Jianglai Liu, Xun Chen and Xiangdong Ji

doi:10.1038/nphys4039

Direct dark matter searches are pushing the limits on the scattering of weakly interacting massive particles on normal matter so WIMPs are running out of places to hide.


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Reviews

How dark matter came to matter

J. G. de Swart, G. Bertone and J. van Dongen

doi:10.1038/s41550017-0059

The acceptance of dark matter came slowly despite its abundance. Jaco de Swart and colleagues reconstruct the history of how dark matter brought astronomers to cosmology in their Review Article.

Indirect dark matter searches in gamma and cosmic rays

Jan Conrad and Olaf Reimer

doi:10.1038/nphys4049

Dark matter could decay into conventional particles leaving behind specific signatures in the gamma-rays and cosmic rays. Astronomical observations are used to search for these elusive dark matter footprints.

High-energy neutrino astrophysics

Francis Halzen

doi:10.1038/nphys3816

Neutrinos from deep space can be used as astronomical messengers providing clues about the origin of cosmic rays or dark matter. The IceCube experiment is leading the way in neutrino astronomy.


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Measure For Measure

A constant conflict

doi:10.1038/nphys4055

Barbara Ryden

Narrowing down the value of the Hubble constant has been problematic — probably a manifestation of the dark-energy mystery, writes Barbara Ryden.


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Mission Control

Unveiling the radio cosmos

Keith Vanderlinde

doi:10.1038/s41550-017-0037

Using a radio telescope with no moving parts, the dark energy speeding up the expansion of the Universe can be probed in unprecedented detail, says Keith Vanderlinde, on behalf of the CHIME collaboration.


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