Letter abstract


Nature Photonics 2, 86 - 89 (2008)
Published online: 20 January 2008 | doi:10.1038/nphoton.2007.277

Subject Categories: Optoelectronic devices and components | Nanophotonics

Dynamic manipulation and separation of individual semiconducting and metallic nanowires

Arash Jamshidi1,6, Peter J. Pauzauskie2,3,6,7, P. James Schuck4, Aaron T. Ohta1, Pei-Yu Chiou5, Jeffrey Chou1, Peidong Yang2,3 & Ming C. Wu1


The synthesis of nanowires has advanced in the past decade to the point where a vast range of insulating, semiconducting and metallic materials1 are available for use in integrated, heterogeneous optoelectronic devices at nanometre scales2. However, a persistent challenge has been the development of a general strategy for the manipulation of individual nanowires with arbitrary composition. Here we report that individual semiconducting and metallic nanowires with diameters below 20 nm are addressable with forces generated by optoelectronic tweezers3. Using 100,000 times less optical power density than optical tweezers, optoelectronic tweezers are capable of transporting individual nanowires with speeds four times greater than the maximum speeds achieved by optical tweezers. A real-time array of silver nanowires is formed using photopatterned virtual electrodes, demonstrating the potential for massively parallel assemblies. Furthermore, optoelectronic tweezers enable the separation of semiconducting and metallic nanowires, suggesting a broad range of applications for the separation and heterogeneous integration of one-dimensional nanoscale materials.

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  1. Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
  2. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
  3. Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
  4. Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA
  5. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California 90095, USA
  6. These authors contributed equally to this work.
  7. Present address: Chemistry, Materials, and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-235, Livermore, California 94551

Correspondence to: Peidong Yang2,3 e-mail: p_yang@berkeley.edu

Correspondence to: Ming C. Wu1 e-mail: wu@eecs.berkeley.edu



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