Volume 8 Issue 7 July 2013

Volume 8 Issue 7

The development of sophisticated devices to monitor, and eventually interfere with, essential cellular processes is an ongoing challenge. Now, Jos� A. Plaza and colleagues have fabricated silicon chips that are small enough to be internalized inside cells and detect intracellular pressure changes. These devices can be considered the first step towards achieving a broad range of intracellular nanochips. A pseudocoloured scanning microscopy image (on the cover) shows a HeLa cell interacting with a silicon chip pressure sensor.

Letter p517

IMAGE: MARTA DUCH AND JOS� A. PLAZA

COVER DESIGN: ALEX WING

Editorial

  • Editorial |

    On the twentieth anniversary of two influential papers we consider past developments and future opportunities for thermoelectric materials.

Correspondence

Commentary

  • Commentary |

    The theoretical work done by Lyndon Hicks and Mildred Dresselhaus 20 years ago on the effect of reduced dimensionality on thermoelectric efficiency has had deep implications beyond the initial expectations.

    • Joseph P. Heremans
    • , Mildred S. Dresselhaus
    • , Lon E. Bell
    •  & Donald T. Morelli

Thesis

  • Thesis |

    Nanobots have in the past been a fixture of science fiction writing and illustration, and such ideas are now also appearing in scientific research. But, as Chris Toumey explains, practical nanobots are different from their science fiction counterparts.

    • Chris Toumey

Research Highlights

News and Views

  • News & Views |

    Lattice surface plasmons enable large-area unidirectional emission of coherent light generated at deep subwavelength scales.

    • Jorge Bravo-Abad
    •  & Francisco J. García-Vidal
  • News & Views |

    The response of bacteria to antibiotics can be quickly assessed by monitoring the fluctuations of cantilevers coated with the bacteria.

    • Rachel A. McKendry
    •  & Natascha Kappeler

Letters

Articles