Brief Communication abstract


Nature Methods 7, 47 - 49 (2010)
Published online: 29 November 2009 | Corrected online: 12 April 2010 | doi:10.1038/nmeth.1404

Chromatin profiling by directly sequencing small quantities of immunoprecipitated DNA

Alon Goren1,2,3,4,7, Fatih Ozsolak5,7, Noam Shoresh1,7, Manching Ku1,2,3,4, Mazhar Adli1,2,3,4, Chris Hart5, Melissa Gymrek1,2,3,4, Or Zuk1, Aviv Regev1,2,6, Patrice M Milos5 & Bradley E Bernstein1,2,3,4

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Chromatin structure and transcription factor localization can be assayed genome-wide by sequencing genomic DNA fractionated by protein occupancy or other properties, but current technologies involve multiple steps that introduce bias and inefficiency. Here we apply a single-molecule approach to directly sequence chromatin immunoprecipitated DNA with minimal sample manipulation. This method is compatible with just 50 pg of DNA and should thus facilitate charting chromatin maps from limited cell populations.

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  1. Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
  2. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  3. Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  4. Center for Systems Biology and Center for Cancer Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  5. Helicos BioSciences Corporation, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
  6. Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
  7. These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to: Bradley E Bernstein1,2,3,4 e-mail: bernstein.bradley@mgh.harvard.edu

* In the version of this supplementary file originally posted online, Figure 1 was truncated. The error has been corrected in this file as of 12 April 2010.

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