Image: Sripriya Ravindra Kumar. Cover Design: Erin Dewalt.

Read the May issue

Latest Research

  • Brief Communication |

    Theoretical and experimental guidelines to determine laser intensity for single-photon excitation in microcrystals for ultrafast pump–probe experiments by serial femtosecond crystallography.

    • Marie Luise Grünbein
    • , Miriam Stricker
    • , Gabriela Nass Kovacs
    • , Marco Kloos
    • , R. Bruce Doak
    • , Robert L. Shoeman
    • , Jochen Reinstein
    • , Sylvain Lecler
    • , Stefan Haacke
    •  & Ilme Schlichting
  • Brief Communication |

    jYCaMP1, a yellow variant of the calcium indicator jGCaMP7, enables fast multicolor two-photon imaging at excitation wavelengths above 1,000 nm for use with popular ytterbium-doped fiber and modelocked semiconductor lasers.

    • Manuel Alexander Mohr
    • , Daniel Bushey
    • , Abhi Aggarwal
    • , Jonathan S. Marvin
    • , Jeong Jun Kim
    • , Emiliano Jimenez Marquez
    • , Yajie Liang
    • , Ronak Patel
    • , John J. Macklin
    • , Chi-Yu Lee
    • , Arthur Tsang
    • , Getahun Tsegaye
    • , Allison M. Ahrens
    • , Jerry L. Chen
    • , Douglas S. Kim
    • , Allan M. Wong
    • , Loren L. Looger
    • , Eric R. Schreiter
    •  & Kaspar Podgorski
  • Brief Communication |

    Sorting RT-FDC combines real-time fluorescence and deformability cytometry with sorting based on standing surface acoustic waves to transfer molecular specificity to label-free, image-based cell sorting using an efficient deep neural network.

    • Ahmad Ahsan Nawaz
    • , Marta Urbanska
    • , Maik Herbig
    • , Martin Nötzel
    • , Martin Kräter
    • , Philipp Rosendahl
    • , Christoph Herold
    • , Nicole Toepfner
    • , Markéta Kubánková
    • , Ruchi Goswami
    • , Shada Abuhattum
    • , Felix Reichel
    • , Paul Müller
    • , Anna Taubenberger
    • , Salvatore Girardo
    • , Angela Jacobi
    •  & Jochen Guck

News & Comment

Collection

Expanding the CRISPR Toolbox

The CRISPR-Cas9 system is best known for its ability to knock out or replace specific genes, via targeted cleavage of the genome. But scientists are developing many more applications, typically by using an inactive Cas9 to target other enzymes to specific genomic sites. From transcriptional regulation to base editing, these developments are extending the range of biological questions that can be probed with CRISPR/Cas9.