Letter abstract


Nature Materials 4, 820 - 825 (2005)
doi:10.1038/nmat1512

Subject Category: Electronic materials

Integrated fibres for self-monitored optical transport

Mehmet Bayindir1, Ofer Shapira1,2, Dursen Saygin-Hinczewski3, Jeff Viens3, Ayman F. Abouraddy1, John D. Joannopoulos1,4,5 and Yoel Fink1,3,4

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The ability to integrate distinct functional elements into a single device structure enables the realization of systems with higher-level functionality. Here we report on the design and fabrication of a fibre device structure that contains integrated optical, electrical and thermal elements for self-monitored optical transport. The fibre transmission element uses a hollow-core multilayer cylindrical photonic bandgap structure1, 2 designed to guide high-power radiation at 10.6 mum along the fibre axis3. Multiple thermal-detection elements are placed in the vicinity of the hollow core for the purpose of temperature monitoring along the entire fibre length. Metal wires bridged by a semiconductor layer extend along the length of the fibre and deliver an electrical response to the fibre ends on change in the fibre temperature. The multimaterial fibre is drawn at high speeds from a single preform4 to produce extended lengths of optically and thermally functional fibres. The exponential dependence on temperature of the electrical conductivity of the semiconducting material allows for the discrimination, in real time, between normal transmission conditions and those that are indicative of localized defect formation, thus enabling a self-monitoring high-power optical transmission line for failure prediction and prevention.

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  1. Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
  2. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
  3. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
  4. Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA
  5. Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA

Correspondence to: Mehmet Bayindir1 e-mail: mehmet@mit.edu

Correspondence to: Dursen Saygin-Hinczewski3 Permanent address: Department of Physics, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak 34469 Istanbul, Turkey

Correspondence to: Yoel Fink1,3,4 e-mail: yoel@mit.edu

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