Letter abstract


Nature Medicine 13, 1359 - 1362 (2007)
Published online: 14 October 2007 | doi:10.1038/nm1653

Classification and prediction of clinical Alzheimer's diagnosis based on plasma signaling proteins

Sandip Ray1,16, Markus Britschgi2,16, Charles Herbert1, Yoshiko Takeda-Uchimura2, Adam Boxer3, Kaj Blennow4, Leah F Friedman5, Douglas R Galasko6, Marek Jutel7, Anna Karydas3, Jeffrey A Kaye8, Jerzy Leszek9, Bruce L Miller3, Lennart Minthon10, Joseph F Quinn8, Gil D Rabinovici3, William H Robinson11, Marwan N Sabbagh12, Yuen T So2, D Larry Sparks12, Massimo Tabaton13, Jared Tinklenberg5, Jerome A Yesavage5, Robert Tibshirani14 & Tony Wyss-Coray2,15

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A molecular test for Alzheimer's disease could lead to better treatment and therapies. We found 18 signaling proteins in blood plasma that can be used to classify blinded samples from Alzheimer's and control subjects with close to 90% accuracy and to identify patients who had mild cognitive impairment that progressed to Alzheimer's disease 2–6 years later. Biological analysis of the 18 proteins points to systemic dysregulation of hematopoiesis, immune responses, apoptosis and neuronal support in presymptomatic Alzheimer's disease.

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  1. Satoris, Inc., 2686 Middlefield Road, Suite E, Redwood City, California 94063, USA.
  2. Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5235, USA.
  3. Department of Neurology, Memory and Aging Center, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 706, San Francisco, California 94117, USA.
  4. Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Department of Experimental Neuroscience, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, University of Göteborg, Blå stråket 15, 431 80 Mölndal, Sweden.
  5. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5550, USA.
  6. Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive #9127, La Jolla, California 92093-9127, USA.
  7. Department of Internal Medicine and Allergology, Wroclaw Medical University, Traugutta 57, 50-417 Wroclaw, Poland.
  8. Layton Aging & Alzheimer's Disease Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, CR131, Portland, Oregon 97201-3098, USA.
  9. Department of Psychiatry, Wroclaw Medical University, Pasteura 10, 51-622 Wroclaw, Poland.
  10. Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Ingång 56 plan 7, SE-205 02 Malmö, Sweden.
  11. Division of Immunology and Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5166, USA.
  12. Sun Health Research Institute, 10515 West Santa Fe Drive, Sun City, Arizona 85351, USA.
  13. Department of Neurosciences, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genoa, Via A. De Toni 5, 16132 Genoa, Italy.
  14. Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, 300 Pasteur Drive, California 94305-5405, USA.
  15. Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, 3801 Miranda Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304, USA.
  16. These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence to: Tony Wyss-Coray2,15 e-mail: twc@stanford.edu



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