Journal home
Advance online publication
Current issue
Archive
Press releases
Supplements
Focuses
Guide to authors
Online submissionOnline submission
For referees
Free online issue
Contact the journal
Subscribe
Advertising
work@npg
Reprints and permissions
About this site
For librarians
 
NPG Resources
Nature
Nature Reviews
Nature Immunology
Nature Cell Biology
Nature Genetics
news@nature.com
Nature Conferences
Dissect Medicine
NPG Subject areas
Biotechnology
Cancer
Chemistry
Clinical Medicine
Dentistry
Development
Drug Discovery
Earth Sciences
Evolution & Ecology
Genetics
Immunology
Materials Science
Medical Research
Microbiology
Molecular Cell Biology
Neuroscience
Pharmacology
Physics
Browse all publications
Review
Nature Medicine  10, S82 - S87 (2004)
Published online: ; | doi:10.1038/nm1141

Influenza: old and new threats

Peter Palese

Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York 10029, USA.

Correspondence should be addressed to Peter Palese peter.palese@mssm.edu
Influenza remains an important disease in humans and animals. In contrast to measles, smallpox and poliomyelitis, influenza is caused by viruses that undergo continuous antigenic change and that possess an animal reservoir. Thus, new epidemics and pandemics are likely to occur in the future, and eradication of the disease will be difficult to achieve. Although it is not clear whether a new pandemic is imminent, it would be prudent to take into account the lessons we have learned from studying different human and animal influenza viruses. Specifically, reconstruction of the genes of the 1918 pandemic virus and studies on their contribution to virulence will be important steps toward understanding the biological capabilities of this lethal virus. Increasing the availability of new antiviral drugs and developing superior vaccines will provide us with better approaches to control influenza and to have a positive impact on disease load. A concern is that the imposition of new rules for working with infectious influenza viruses under high security and high containment conditions will stifle scientific progress. The complex questions of what makes an influenza virus transmissible from one human to another and from one species to another, as well as how the immune system interacts with the virus, will require the active collaboration and unencumbered work of many scientific groups.

MORE ARTICLES LIKE THIS

These links to content published by NPG are automatically generated.

NEWS AND VIEWS

New clues to the emergence of flu pandemics

Nature Medicine News and Views (01 Oct 1998)

Extinct 1918 virus comes alive

Nature Medicine News and Views (01 Nov 2005)

See all 11 matches for News And Views
 Top
Abstract
Previous | Next
Table of contents
Full textFull text
Download PDFDownload PDF
Send to a friendSend to a friend
Competing financial interests
Figures & Tables
Export citation
natureproducts

Search buyers guide:

 
ADVERTISEMENT
 
Nature Medicine
ISSN: 1078-8956
EISSN: 1546-170X
Journal home | Advance online publication | Current issue | Archive | Press releases | Supplements | Focuses | For authors | Online submission | For referees | Free online issue | About the journal | Contact the journal | Subscribe | Advertising | work@npg | Reprints and permissions | About this site | For librarians
Nature Publishing Group, publisher of Nature, and other science journals and reference works©2004 Nature Publishing Group | Privacy policy