Focus

Focus on Reproductive Biology

In what direction is the field of reproductive biology going? By bringing together input from top scientists and decision makers interested in this field, this focus identifies the recent papers with the most impact in reproductive biology and identifies the key issues that are shaping our thinking in this field.

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Introduction

Focus on Reproductive Biology

Reproductive biology p1166

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1166

In what direction is the field of reproductive biology moving? Do funding priorities match hot research areas? In this special focus, we try to find out.


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News

Focus on Reproductive Biology

As obesity epidemic grows, research shows fitness benefits fetal development p1167

Genevive Bjorn

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1167


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Interventions might offer a pregnant pause in addiction p1168

Erika Check Hayden

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1168


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Better tests boost IVF success p1169

Coco Ballantyne

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1169a


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Delivery decision is nothing to sneeze at p1169

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1169b


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Male biological clock possibly linked to autism, other disorders p1170

Charlotte Schubert

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1170a


Focus on Reproductive Biology

New techniques preserve fertility hope for women p1170

Apoorva Mandavilli

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1170b


Focus on Reproductive Biology

As IVF becomes more common, some concerns remain p1171

Prashant Nair

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1171


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Common reproductive disorders may have immunological basis p1172

Alisa Opar

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1172


Focus on Reproductive Biology

My mother's keeper p1173

Coco Ballantyne

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1173


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Geneticists crack the code of infertility p1174

Virginia Hughes

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1174


Data Page

Focus on Reproductive Biology

By the numbers... p1175

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1175


News Feature

Focus on Reproductive Biology

Tinkering in the womb: the future of fetal surgery pp1176 - 1177

Cassandra Willyard

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1176


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Analysis

Focus on Reproductive Biology

The top papers on reproduction research 2004–2008 pp1178 - 1179

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1178

Which papers have provided the most interesting advances in reproduction research over the past three or four years? Which new discoveries have been the most important to or are likely to have the highest impact on the field?


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Highly cited papers on reproductive biology (2005–2007) pp1180 - 1181

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1180


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News and Views

Focus on Reproductive Biology

Advances in fertility preservation for female cancer survivors pp1182 - 1184

Mats Brännström & Milan Milenkovic

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1182

A method using tissue engineering principles for the culture of immature ovarian follicles followed by fertilization of oocytes in vitro has been presented by Xu et al.1. This methodology is a great step forward toward new technology for fertility preservation in female cancer patients.


Focus on Reproductive Biology

The upside of natural killers pp1184 - 1185

Khalil Karimi, Sandra M Blois & Petra C Arck

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1184

Natural killer (NK) cells, originally so named because they have the capacity to kill other cells without activation, can be licensed and educated to regulate tissue homeostasis. This notion has recently been shown in reproduction—in both normal physiology by Hanna et al. and severe pathophysiology (preeclampsia) by Hiby et al.


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Is it my grandparents' fault? pp1186 - 1187

Bernard Robaire

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1186

Results from two independent groups of researchers have revolutionized our thinking about the potential long-term consequences of exposure to common foreign chemicals, or xenobiotics. The studies indicate that exposure to such chemicals during key windows of gestation can affect not only the children exposed in utero but also their children and perhaps even their grandchildren.


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Angiogenesis factors and preeclampsia pp1187 - 1188

Ralf Dechend & Friedrich C Luft

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1187

Two recent studies—one in humans by Levine et al. in 2004 and one in mice by Venkatesha et al. in 2006—have shown an important role for placental-derived soluble antiangiogenic factors as mediators of the pathologies associated with preeclampsia. These findings may have profound implications for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of this devastating condition.


Focus on Reproductive Biology

From stem cells to germ cells and back again pp1188 - 1190

Marco Conti & Linda Giudice

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1188

Producing germ cells in vitro would open important new avenues for regenerative medicine, and obtaining alternative sources of pluripotent stem cells is desirable. In this regard, Geijsen et al. have shown that it is possible to differentiate stem cells into cells similar to male gametes, whereas Guan et al. reported the ability to turn undifferentiated germ cells into pluripotent stem cells.


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Making eggs: is it now or later? pp1190 - 1191

Teresa K Woodruff

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1190

Although it has been thought that female mammals develop all the eggs they will ever have by the time they are born, new research suggesting otherwise has now sparked a debate.


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Two faces of PTEN pp1192 - 1193

Takiko Daikoku & Sudhansu K Dey

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1192

A small number of women (approximately 1%) suffer from premature ovarian failure in which their ovarian follicle reserve is exhausted before age 40. Recent studies in mice show that the absence of a tumor suppressor gene, PTEN, in oocytes prematurely induces global follicular activation, depleting the follicle reserve in a manner similar to premature ovarian failure.


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Research Highlights p1194

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1194


Timeline

Focus on Reproductive Biology

Timeline: the role of kisspeptins in reproductive biology p1196

Manuel Tena-Sempere

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1196

Although the focus of this issue is on contributions published over the past three to four years, the discovery of the kisspeptins was hailed as an important breakthrough by our advisors so frequently that we had to include it. Manuel Tena-Sempere guides us on a tour of the key findings that have shaped this blossoming field.


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Review

Focus on Reproductive Biology

The biology of infertility: research advances and clinical challenges pp1197 - 1213

Martin M Matzuk & Dolores J Lamb

doi:10.1038/nm.f.1895


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Commentaries

Focus on Reproductive Biology

Funding for the reproductive sciences in the US pp1214 - 1217

Jerome F Strauss, III & Louis V De Paolo

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1214


Focus on Reproductive Biology

Funding for research in reproduction in the European Union pp1218 - 1220

Gérard Chaouat

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1218


Focus on Reproductive Biology

European funding for reproduction research—A multinational perspective p1222

Carlos Simón

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1222a

Funds from the European Union are not the only source available to the continent's reproductive research community. Each country independently sponsors the work of these scientists, but, as illustrated by snapshots in the following pages, there are huge differences in the commitment of the various European nations to tackle the challenges of reproductive biomedicine.


Focus on Reproductive Biology

European funding for reproduction research—A multinational perspective p1222

Thomas M D'Hooghe

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1222b

Funds from the European Union are not the only source available to the continent's reproductive research community. Each country independently sponsors the work of these scientists, but, as illustrated by snapshots in the following pages, there are huge differences in the commitment of the various European nations to tackle the challenges of reproductive biomedicine.


Focus on Reproductive Biology

European funding for reproduction research—A multinational perspective p1223

Daniel Rukavina

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1223a

Funds from the European Union are not the only source available to the continent's reproductive research community. Each country independently sponsors the work of these scientists, but, as illustrated by snapshots in the following pages, there are huge differences in the commitment of the various European nations to tackle the challenges of reproductive biomedicine.


Focus on Reproductive Biology

European funding for reproduction research—A multinational perspective p1223

Antonis Makrigiannakis

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1223b

Funds from the European Union are not the only source available to the continent's reproductive research community. Each country independently sponsors the work of these scientists, but, as illustrated by snapshots in the following pages, there are huge differences in the commitment of the various European nations to tackle the challenges of reproductive biomedicine.


Focus on Reproductive Biology

European funding for reproduction research—A multinational perspective p1224

Hilary Critchley & Philippa Saunders

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1224a

Funds from the European Union are not the only source available to the continent's reproductive research community. Each country independently sponsors the work of these scientists, but, as illustrated by snapshots in the following pages, there are huge differences in the commitment of the various European nations to tackle the challenges of reproductive biomedicine.


Focus on Reproductive Biology

European funding for reproduction research—A multinational perspective p1224

Thomas Strowitzki

doi:10.1038/nm1108-1224b

Funds from the European Union are not the only source available to the continent's reproductive research community. Each country independently sponsors the work of these scientists, but, as illustrated by snapshots in the following pages, there are huge differences in the commitment of the various European nations to tackle the challenges of reproductive biomedicine.


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