Review abstract


Nature Geoscience 2, 389 - 397 (2009)
Published online: 17 May 2009 | doi:10.1038/ngeo529

Subject Categories: Planetary science | Volcanology, mineralogy and petrology

Volcanism in the Solar System

Lionel Wilson1


The myriad bodies that occur in the Solar System have a wide range of properties, from giant gaseous planets such as Jupiter to small, solid, rocky satellites such as our Moon. Exploration by spacecraft during the past four decades has shown that volcanism — an important mechanism by which internal heat is transported to the surface — is common on many of these bodies. There are many common traits; for example, relatively quiet eruptions of molten rock occur on such diverse bodies as the Earth, Mars and Jupiter's moon Io. The volcanic constructs produced, however, vary strikingly, and range from Olympus Mons on Mars, at over 20 km high, to relatively tiny cones on Earth no more than a few tens of metres high. The recognition of icy volcanoes spewing water or organic liquids on some of Saturn's moons constitutes one of the most exciting results to emerge from recent space missions.

Top
  1. Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ, UK.
    e-mail: l.wilson@lancaster.ac.uk


MORE ARTICLES LIKE THIS

These links to content published by NPG are automatically generated.

NEWS AND VIEWS

Volcanism on Mars

Nature News and Views (26 Nov 1981)

Magmatic snap, crackle and pop

Nature News and Views (14 May 1981)

Volcanic features of Io

Nature News and Views (30 Aug 1979)

See all 15 matches for News And Views

Extra navigation

Subscribe to Nature Geoscience

Subscribe

naturejobs

natureevents

ADVERTISEMENT