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Article
Nature Genetics - 38, 1005 - 1014 (2006)
Published online: 30 July 2006; | doi:10.1038/ng1852

Characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster genome at the nuclear lamina

Helen Pickersgill1, 3, Bernike Kalverda1, 4, Elzo de Wit2, 4, Wendy Talhout2, Maarten Fornerod1 & Bas van Steensel2

1  Department of Tumor Biology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

2  Department of Molecular Biology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

3  Present address: Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.

4  These authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence should be addressed to Maarten Fornerod m.fornerod@nki.nl or Bas van Steensel b.v.steensel@nki.nl

The nuclear lamina binds chromatin in vitro and is thought to function in its organization, but genes that interact with it are unknown. Using an in vivo approach, we identified approx500 Drosophila melanogaster genes that interact with B-type lamin (Lam). These genes are transcriptionally silent and late replicating, lack active histone marks and are widely spaced. These factors collectively predict lamin binding behavior, indicating that the nuclear lamina integrates variant and invariant chromatin features. Consistently, proximity of genomic regions to the nuclear lamina is partly conserved between cell types, and induction of gene expression or active histone marks reduces Lam binding. Lam target genes cluster in the genome, and these clusters are coordinately expressed during development. This genome-wide analysis gives clear insight into the nature and dynamic behavior of the genome at the nuclear lamina, and implies that intergenic DNA functions in the global organization of chromatin in the nucleus.

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Nature Genetics
ISSN: 1061-4036
EISSN: 1546-1718
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