Journal home
Advance online publication
Current issue
Archive
Press releases
Free Association (blog)
Supplements
Focuses
Guide to authors
Online submissionOnline submission
For referees
Free online issue
Contact the journal
Subscribe
Advertising
work@npg
Reprints and permissions
About this site
For librarians
 
NPG Resources
Nature
Nature Biotechnology
Nature Cell Biology
Nature Medicine
Nature Methods
Nature Reviews Cancer
Nature Reviews Genetics
Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology
news@nature.com
Nature Conferences
RNAi Gateway
NPG Subject areas
Biotechnology
Cancer
Chemistry
Clinical Medicine
Dentistry
Development
Drug Discovery
Earth Sciences
Evolution & Ecology
Genetics
Immunology
Materials Science
Medical Research
Microbiology
Molecular Cell Biology
Neuroscience
Pharmacology
Physics
Browse all publications
Perspective
Nature Genetics  36, S34 - S42 (2004)
Published online: ; | doi:10.1038/ng1437

Will tomorrow's medicines work for everyone?

Sarah K Tate & David B Goldstein

Department of Biology, University College London, Darwin Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK.

Correspondence should be addressed to David B Goldstein d.goldstein@ucl.ac.uk
Throughout much of the world, 'race' and 'ethnicity' are key determinants of health. For example, African Americans have, by some estimates, a twofold higher incidence of fatal heart attacks and a 10% higher incidence of cancer1, 2 than European Americans, and South Asian− or Caribbean-born British are approx3.5 times as likely to die as a direct result of diabetes than are British of European ancestry3. The health care that people receive also depends on 'race' and 'ethnicity'. African Americans are less likely to receive cancer-screening services and more likely to have late-stage cancer when diagnosed2 than European Americans. Health disparities such as these are one of the greatest social injustices in the developed world and one of the most important scientific and political challenges.

MORE ARTICLES LIKE THIS

These links to content published by NPG are automatically generated.

NEWS AND VIEWS

In genetic control of disease, does 'race' matter?

Nature Genetics News and Views (01 Dec 2004)

RESEARCH

Bidil: recontextualizing the race debate

The Pharmacogenomics Journal Article Response

See all 25 matches for Research
 Top
Abstract
Previous | Next
Table of contents
Full textFull text
Download PDFDownload PDF
Send to a friendSend to a friend
Save this linkSave this link

natureevents

Figures & Tables
Export citation
natureproducts

Search buyers guide:

 
ADVERTISEMENT
 
Nature Genetics
ISSN: 1061-4036
EISSN: 1546-1718
Journal home | Advance online publication | Current issue | Archive | Press releases | Supplements | Focuses | For authors | Online submission | Permissions | For referees | Free online issue | About the journal | Contact the journal | Subscribe | Advertising | work@npg | naturereprints | About this site | For librarians
Nature Publishing Group, publisher of Nature, and other science journals and reference works©2004 Nature Publishing Group | Privacy policy